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Tag: tumors

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Health
July 10 (UPI) -- Nanoparticle "backpacks" with immune-stimulating drugs successfully helped T cells destroy solid tumors in mice, researchers report. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed the method found it could enhance the T cells' activity without harmful side effects. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the researchers report that 60 percent of treated animals' tumors disappeared completely in an early test of the method. The drugs are made of a gel from molecules of cytokine IL-15 held together by a cross-linker that degrades when the T cell reaches a tumor and is activated. Nanoparticles are between 1 and 100 nanometers in size -- comparatively, a human hair is 75,000 nanometers thick. "We found you could greatly improve ...
New drug may treat difficult lung, pancreatic cancer tumors

New drug may treat difficult lung, pancreatic cancer tumors

Health
May 29 (UPI) -- A new class of drugs, known as SHP2 inhibitors, may be effective against a wider range of cancers than previously thought, including treating pancreatic and lung cancer tumors, the Technical University of Munich said Tuesday. The drugs, which are typically not used on patients with hard-to-treat tumors, are currently being tested on patients with aggressive cancers, TUM said in a statement. Both pancreatic and lung cancers are collectively classified as KRAS tumors, due to their shared genetic error. The genetic error means that cell proteins, which are involved in cell division, no longer work properly and are always active -- leading to overactive cell division and tumor formation. Because KRAS proteins also play a crucial role for healthy cells, deactivating the protei...
Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Health
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Scientists at Rice University are perfecting a novel drug delivery system for treating cancer. The system utilizes gold nanoparticles, which, when zapped with a laser, release a drug inside the tumor cells.In recent lab tests, scientists used gold nanoparticles to smuggle toxic doses of two common cancer drugs, lapatinib and docetaxel, into breast cancer cells. When hit with the laser, the nanoshells successfully released the drug doses.Drugs used to treat cancer are especially toxic and are often rejected by tumor cells. To have an effect on the hard-to-penetrate cells, large doses are required. These large doses cause a variety of harmful, often intolerable side effects.By sneaking small doses into cancer cells, scientists can more accurately target tumors while avoiding ...