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Tag: U.S.

Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Health
Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Roughly one in 10 American children receive unnecessary healthcare services, driving up costs and exposing them to potential side effects, a new analysis suggests. An analysis of medical data for 8.6 million publicly and privately insured children in 12 states, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, suggests young people receive diagnostic tests, imaging tests and prescription drugs they ultimately don't need. Many were treated for conditions, like acute sinus infections, they didn't have and were given antibiotics for colds, which is considered inappropriate according to most care guidelines. Part of the issue may be a fear of missing something, on the part of both doctors and parents, researchers say. "There are steps that parents can take to minimize the possibi...
Lockheed surpasses 2019 F-35 delivery goal with 134 for U.S., allies

Lockheed surpasses 2019 F-35 delivery goal with 134 for U.S., allies

Business
Dec. 30 (UPI) -- Lockheed Martin announced the delivery of its 134th F-35 fighter plane in 2019 on Monday, exceeding its goal of 131 for the year. The last F-35 delivery of 2019 is a vertical-takeoff-and-landing plane, the most expensive of its three variants, and is destined for the U.S. Marine Corps, the company said in a statement. Deliveries this year included 81 aircraft for the U.S. military, 30 to international partners and 23 to Foreign Military Sales customers. Ten countries currently have the plane in their air forces. Over 450 of the aircraft have been built overall, with hundreds more ordered for future production. The United States expects to eventually have over 2,000 of its three F-35 variants, to replace aging planes and outmoded designs. Sales of the F-35 have been part...
U.S. government joins whistle-blower suit accusing Navistar of false billing

U.S. government joins whistle-blower suit accusing Navistar of false billing

Business
Dec. 5 (UPI) -- The federal government has joined a lawsuit accusing Navistar International and its defense unit of defrauding the United States to the tune of $ 1.3 billion, according to court filings made public this week. The legal complaint, released Wednesday, accuses the company of violating the False Claims Act by submitting fraudulent invoices and charging inflated prices for commercial parts for military vehicles used by the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan. "The Department of Justice will hold accountable those contractors who falsify information and thereby cause the military to pay inflated prices," said Jody Hunt, assistant attorney general for the Civil Division. "We will take steps necessary to protect the military's procurement process from abuse." The U.S. Marine Co...
Nearly half of U.S. population will be obese by 2030, analysis says

Nearly half of U.S. population will be obese by 2030, analysis says

Health
Dec. 18 (UPI) -- Nearly half of all Americans will be obese within the next 10 years, a new analysis has found. Researchers at T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University, who will have their findings published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, also suggest that more than half of the population in 29 U.S. states will be obese. Currently, the analysis estimates that 40 percent of American adults are obese, with 18 percent severely so. "Prevention is going to be key to better managing this epidemic" of obesity," lead author Zachary Ward, programmer/analyst at Harvard's Center for Health Decision Science, said in a press release. For the study, Ward and his colleagues used self-reported body mass index, or BMI, data from more than 6.2 million adults who particip...
Poverty, lack of social mobility, government distrust contribute to U.S. gun violence

Poverty, lack of social mobility, government distrust contribute to U.S. gun violence

Health
Dec. 17 (UPI) -- Shooting incidents in the United States are often described as random acts of violence. However, a study published Tuesday in PLOS Medicine suggests otherwise, as the authors report that gun homicide rates are higher in areas in which poverty is high and the chances of working one's way up the socioeconomic ladder are low. "In disadvantaged communities, a lack of trust in institutions, such as police, to treat residents with respect may further lead residents to believe that the formal apparatus of social control is unjust, resulting in a greater willingness to take the law into their own hands," the author, Daniel Kim, an associate professor in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University, wrote in the study. The Centers for Disease Control and Preven