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UK's 'no-deal' Brexit plans warn of credit card fees

UK's 'no-deal' Brexit plans warn of credit card fees

Business
Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab has set out what he called "practical and proportionate" advice in case the UK leaves the EU without a deal.The guidance includes instructions for businesses who could face extra paperwork at borders and contingency plans to avoid medicine shortages.Britons visiting the EU could also face extra credit card charges.Ministers say a deal is the most likely outcome but that "short-term disruption" is possible without one.BBC political correspondent Chris Mason described the publication as a "vast swirling porridge of detail - much of it at a technical level, advising individual industries about the manner in which they are regulated in the event of a no-deal Brexit".In the 24 documents, which cover indus...
WH Smith voted UK's worst High Street shop in Which? survey

WH Smith voted UK's worst High Street shop in Which? survey

Business
WH Smith has been voted the worst retailer on the UK High Street in a survey of more than 10,000 consumers.Customers complained the shops were out-of-date, products were expensive and staff were rude in the survey by consumer group Which?Cosmetics chain Lush, discounter Savers and toy chain Smyths Toys came top in the survey, which asked shoppers for their thoughts on about 100 retailers.WH Smith said just 184 shoppers had commented on its stores in the survey."We serve 12 million customers each week, and despite a challenging retail environment we continue to open new shops, and to maintain our presence on the UK High Street," a spokesperson said. Which? said its ranking was based on customers' experiences of buying items other than groceries, their leve...
Publicity shy chemicals boss is UK's richest person

Publicity shy chemicals boss is UK's richest person

Business
Jim Ratcliffe, a 65-year-old chemicals entrepreneur, is now the richest man in the UK, according to The Sunday Times Rich List. Mr Ratcliffe - previously described by the Rich List as "publicity shy" and having grown up "on a council estate in Greater Manchester" - has leapt up from 18th position last year after seeing his wealth rise by £15.3bn to £21.05bn in a single year.His increased wealth is down to the successes of Ineos, the London-headquartered chemicals company which is currently locked in a legal battle with the Scottish government over its moratorium on fracking.Mr Ratcliffe is chairman and CEO. The company's director Andy Currie and finance director John Reece were also pushed into the list's top 20, taking joint 6th place with fortunes of £7bn e...
UK's most polluted towns and cities revealed

UK's most polluted towns and cities revealed

Health
More than 40 towns and cities in the UK are at or have exceeded air pollution limits set by the World Health Organization, its new report has found.The WHO data shows 31 areas have fine particle air pollution levels above 10 micrograms per cubic metre, with another 15 at that limit.Areas that exceeded the level include London and Manchester, with the Welsh steelworks town Port Talbot the worst.Dirty air can cause debilitating diseases and hasten death. Check the pollution in your areaThe figures on air pollution, contained in the WHO's global report, found Port Talbot had fine particle air pollution levels recorded at 18 micrograms per cubic metre, with the next most polluted UK areas being Scunthorpe and Salford on 15 micrograms.Fine air particle pollution is particularly bad for us, pen...
UK's May to face angry lawmakers over Syria airstrikes

UK's May to face angry lawmakers over Syria airstrikes

World
Prime Minister Theresa May is set to face restive British lawmakers Monday to justify her decision to launch airstrikes against Syria without a vote in Parliament. Royal Air Force jets joined American and French warplanes and ships in hitting targets in Syria Saturday in response to a reported chemical attack in the town of Douma. Parliament, which returned Monday after a spring break, was not consulted about the action. The government is not legally bound to seek lawmakers' approval for military strikes, though it is customary to do so. May's office said Monday that she plans to tell lawmakers that the airstrikes were "in Britain's national interest," were carried out to stop further suffering from chemical weapons attacks and had broad international support. "We cannot allow the use of ...