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‘VAR is making football rotten and I don’t understand the game’ says Tony Cascarino, who rants that technology is destroying football’s ‘soul’

‘VAR is making football rotten and I don’t understand the game’ says Tony Cascarino, who rants that technology is destroying football’s ‘soul’

Sports
Tony Cascarino believes VAR is making football ‘rotten’, with many fans – including himself – being turned away from the beautiful game due to technology.There was controversy once again in the Premier League on Saturday, as Casc’s beloved Liverpool were denied a win at Brighton by an injury time penalty equaliser. Pascal Gross stepped up to fire the spot kick past Alisson, cancelling out Diogo Jota’s 60th minute opener and securing the Seagulls a share of the spoils. Getty Images - Getty Gross’ strike from the spot secured Brighton a point at the Amex Neal Maupay had earlier missed another penalty which would have fired Brighton into the lead, while Mohamed Salah also had a possible opening goal ruled out for offside after a VAR review. And then, after Jo...
Nearly half of consumers don’t understand whole grain labels on foods, study finds

Nearly half of consumers don’t understand whole grain labels on foods, study finds

Health
Aug. 10 (UPI) -- Up to half of all U.S. consumers are confused by the labeling on food products such as cereal, bread and crackers, causing them to make fewer healthy choices when shopping, according to a study published Monday by the journal Public Health Nutrition. Consumers asked to identify the healthier options based on whole grain content made the wrong choice 47% of the time for bread, up to 37% for crackers and 31% for cereal, the researchers said. Advertisement The findings suggest that product labels, particularly as they relate to grain content, are confusing to consumers, researchers said. "The general public has heard [that we should] eat more whole grains and, knowing this, food manufacturers sometimes design their packages to make consumers think [their products] have more ...
DNA helps researchers understand interactions between Stone Age cultures

DNA helps researchers understand interactions between Stone Age cultures

Science
June 5 (UPI) -- Scandinavia was once home to a trio of Stone Age cultures: Funnel Beaker culture, Pitted Ware culture and Battle Axe culture. New research suggests the groups engaged in trade and influenced the cultural practices of others, but never mixed. Funnel Beaker culture featured Scandinavia's earliest farmers. Pitted Ware culture practiced mostly hunting and fishing. Battle Axe culture was characterized by a mix of herding and farming. Advertisement During excavations of a Pitted Ware burial site, researches noted several graves appeared influenced by Battle Axe culture. In Pitted Ware graves, the dead are usually found lying on their backs with hunting tools or bones. "In addition to the typical Pitted Ware graves, there were also several atypical graves with apparent influences...

Sports news LIVE: Premier League stars set up fund to raise money for NHS, Liverpool star would understand being denied title, Ronaldo back to Real Madrid?

Sports
[unable to retrieve full-text content]We will bring you all the latest sports news and updates on how the coronavirus outbreak continues to affect the sporting calendar. Headlines: Premier League stars confirm launch of fund to raise money for NHS amid coronavirus pandemic Sadio Mane EXCLUSIVE: Liverpool superstar would understand if Reds are denied title as Premier League pales in […] talkSPORT
Even babies ‘understand concept of counting’

Even babies ‘understand concept of counting’

Health
Infants as young as 14 months can understand the concept of counting long before they learn the true meaning of "one, two, three", scientists say.The US researchers said toddlers who hear counting out loud appear to be able to recognise quantities.Yet most children don't understand the full meaning of number words until they are about four years old, they argue.The scientists now want to see whether early counting practice leads to better number skills later on.In the study, from Johns Hopkins University, 16 toddlers watched four toys - little dogs or cars - being hidden in a box that they could reach into without seeing the contents. Sometimes the researchers counted out loud as they dropped each toy in, saying, "Look - one, two...