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Bubba Wallace: Kyle Larson deserves another chance after using racial slur

Bubba Wallace: Kyle Larson deserves another chance after using racial slur

Sports
April 16 (UPI) -- Bubba Wallace, the only African American driver competing in the NASCAR Cup Series, believes Kyle Larson deserves a second chance after he used a racial slur during a virtual race. Larson was competing in Sunday's eNASCAR iRacing event when he appeared to lose communication with his spotter on his headset. During a microphone check, Larson said, "You can't hear me?" That comment was followed by the "N-word." The event was live-streamed, making the slur audible for other competitors and viewers. Larson issued a public apology Monday, saying there was "no excuse" for the racial language. Later Monday, his three main sponsors in the Cup Series ended their relationships with him. On Tuesday, Chip Ganassi Racing announced it fired Larson, leaving him without a team to drive...
Coronavirus: New York using mass graves amid outbreak

Coronavirus: New York using mass graves amid outbreak

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device Images have emerged of coffins being buried in a mass grave in New York City, as the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak continues to rise.Workers in hazmat outfits were seen using a ladder to descend into a huge pit where the coffins were stacked.The location is Hart Island, used for New Yorkers with no next of kin or who could not afford a funeral.New York state now has more coronavirus cases than any single country, according to latest figures.The state's confirmed caseload of Covid-19 jumped by 10,000 on Thursday to 159,937, of whom 7,000 have died.Spain has had 153,000 cases and Italy 143,000, while China, where the virus emerged last year, has reported 82,000 cases.The US as a whole has r...
UK using 1.2 billion tonnes of material a year

UK using 1.2 billion tonnes of material a year

Science
The UK is using 1.2 billion tonnes of materials a year – that’s the equivalent of 18.5 tonnes of material for every person in the country.The materials include food, timber products, metals, construction materials and fossil fuels.They are vital to the economy, but the figures show the UK is increasingly reliant on importing its materials, especially from China. Almost 80% come from abroad, the Office for National Statistics numbers show.The statistics matter because extracting materials from the environment uses a great deal of energy, typically generated by burning fossil fuels.Consumption increasingThe UK is signed up to international agreements to reduce its consumption of materials in an attempt to protect the natural world and combat climate change.
Coronavirus: ‘Avoid using microwave to get faster internet’

Coronavirus: ‘Avoid using microwave to get faster internet’

Technology
People should avoid using the microwave at the same time as their wi-fi, media regulator Ofcom has said, as part of advice to help improve internet speeds.It comes as millions work remotely and rely on streaming services after the UK was told to "stay at home". This has put pressure on broadband providers, with BT's Openreach reporting a 20% surge in internet use.The government said reliable internet speeds were "crucial" as the UK battles the coronavirus.Ofcom's advice ranges from the seemingly obvious, like downloading films in advance rather than streaming them when someone else may be trying to make a video call, to the less expected."Did you know that microwave ovens can also reduce wi-fi signals?" Ofcom asks."So don't use the microwave when you're m...
Government using phone location data to tackle virus

Government using phone location data to tackle virus

Technology
The government is working with mobile network O2 to analyse anonymous smartphone location data to see whether people are following its social distancing guidelines, Sky News has learned.The partnership began following a tech summit at Number 10, where officials discussed coronavirus outbreak planning with representatives from the UK's largest phone networks. A spokesperson for O2 confirmed that the company was providing aggregated data to the government so it could observe trends in public movements, particularly in London.The project will not be able to track individuals and is not designed to do so. ...