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Tag: vaccination

Fear, mistrust drive vaccination hesitancy, researchers say

Fear, mistrust drive vaccination hesitancy, researchers say

Health
July 18 (UPI) -- After more than 11,000 died from the Ebola outbreak in Africa, fear of infection reverberated across the globe to the United States. Despite those concerns, half of Americans reported a hesitation or outright refusal to take an anti-Ebola vaccine, according to a study published Thursday in Heliyon. "Facing a raising number of epidemics that create public health dangers, our findings indicate that vaccine hesitancy is associated with social factors that are independent of the perceived effectiveness of vaccines," Kent P. Schwirian, emeritus professor of Sociology at The Ohio State University and study author, said in a news release. "Willingness to take vaccination is positively associated with a generalized sense of fear, trust in the government's ability to control an o...
Pakistan’s vaccination campaign suspended after worker killed

Pakistan’s vaccination campaign suspended after worker killed

World
April 27 (UPI) -- The Pakistan government suspended its anti-polio campaign "for an indefinite period" after a vaccination worker and two security personnel were killed. On Friday, the National Emergency Operation Center for polio asked all provinces to suspend the program, which includes vaccinations. "The uncertain and threatening situation for the front-line polio workers has emerged and we need to save the programme from a further major damage," said the letter obtained by The Hindu. Pakistan authorities arrested Naz Gul earlier this month for undermining the vaccination efforts. In a viral video, he encourages children to act sick after taking the vaccine drops. Nasreen Bibi, 35, died after two men unloaded gunfire on a group of vaccinators standing in front of a home in Pakistan ne...
Cholera vaccination drive starts in Mozambique after cyclone

Cholera vaccination drive starts in Mozambique after cyclone

Health
A cholera vaccination campaign is kicking off to reach nearly 900,000 cyclone survivors in Mozambique as officials rush to contain an outbreak of the disease. Vaccinations are beginning on Wednesday morning in the hard-hit city of Beira, where most of the more than 1,400 cases have been reported since the outbreak was declared a week ago. Mozambican authorities have reported two deaths so far from the acute diarrheal disease, which can kill within hours if not properly treated. Cases also have been confirmed in some outlying communities and vaccinations will begin there on Thursday. Overall the campaign aims to vaccinate some 884,000 people in Beira, Dondo, Nhamatanda and Buzi. More than 100,000 survivors of Cyclone Idai are still living in displacement camps with little access to clean w...
Vaccination deniers gaining traction, NHS boss warns

Vaccination deniers gaining traction, NHS boss warns

Health
The head of NHS England has warned that "vaccination deniers" are gaining traction on social media as part of a "fake news" movement.Simon Stevens said parents were seeing "fake messages" online about vaccines, which was making it harder to "win the public argument" on vaccination.NHS England is considering what action can be taken to stop such messages spreading, Mr Stevens said.He said the health service needed to support parents on the issue.'Fake messages'Speaking at a health summit held by the Nuffield Trust think tank, Mr Stevens said that there had been a "steady decline" in the uptake of the measles vaccine over the last five years. He went on to describe the uptake of the MMR vaccine among five-year-olds in England (87.5% compared with the World ...
Education may help HPV vaccination rate in college men

Education may help HPV vaccination rate in college men

Health
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- Researchers have found that an education program can increase knowledge of human papillomavirus infection in college men leading to higher vaccination rates.The study, published today in The Nurse Practitioner, revealed that male college athletes have low rates of HPV vaccination and relatively little knowledge of their high rates of risk factors for infection, such as multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex and being young at sexual initiation.The findings are of particular importance since a study published last week found that 1 in 9 males age 18 to 69 in the United States are infected with oral HPV, which can cause cancers of the head, neck and throat."The incidence of this cancer has increased 300 percent in the last 20 years," Ashish Deshmukh, a research assistant ...