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‘Significant breakthrough’ in race for coronavirus vaccine

‘Significant breakthrough’ in race for coronavirus vaccine

Technology
The scientist leading the UK's research into a coronavirus vaccine says his team have made a significant breakthrough by reducing a part of the normal development time from "two to three years to just 14 days". Professor Robin Shattock, head of mucosal infection and immunity at Imperial College London, said he is now at the stage to start testing the vaccine on animals as early as next week with human studies in the summer if enough funding is secured. He told Sky News: "Conventional approaches usually take at least two to three years before you even get to the clinic. And we've gone from that sequence to generating a candidate in the laboratory in 14 days. Image: Researchers say they have made a significant breakthrough "And we will ...
The race to find a vaccine: Can coronavirus be cured?

The race to find a vaccine: Can coronavirus be cured?

Technology
Scientists around the world are grappling with how to halt the new coronavirus which has been declared a global public health emergency.Professor Paul Kellam is a virologist who is part of a team at Imperial College in London working on a vaccine for the new coronavirus, which has infected thousands and killed at least 213. The team is one of several around the world trying to find a vaccine. Prof Kellam and British colleagues developed the first genetic analysis of the Middle East respiratory virus (MERS) - also a coronavirus - with Saudi Arabia's department of health, which led to camels being pinpointed as the source.The professor of virus genomics spoke to Sky News about the science behind the new illness and how their knowledge of two previous coronavirus epidemics is helping them fin...
Coronavirus: Scientists race to develop a vaccine

Coronavirus: Scientists race to develop a vaccine

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device A deadly new virus. Thousands of people infected. No cure. No vaccine. We've been here many times before. In the past five years alone, the world has faced outbreaks of Ebola, Zika, another coronavirus called Mers (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), and now the virus simply known as "2019-nCoV".It's already infected thousands of people and killed more than 100. But unlike in many previous outbreaks, where vaccines to protect people have taken years to develop, research for a vaccine to help stem this outbreak got under way within hours of the virus being identified. Chinese officials released its genetic code very quickly. That information helps scientists determine where the virus probably came fr...

Century-old TB vaccine may work better if given in a new way

Technology
Scientists think they can make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective simply by changing how they give itBy LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical WriterJanuary 1, 2020, 7:31 PM3 min readWASHINGTON -- Scientists think they’ve figured out how to make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective: Simply give the shot a different way. In a study with monkeys, injecting the vaccine straight into the bloodstream dramatically improved its effectiveness over today's skin-deep shot, researchers reported Wednesday. “This offers hope,” although more safety studies are required before testing the approach in people, said Dr. Robert Seder of the National Institutes of Health, a senior author of the study. Tuberculosis kills about 1.7 million people a year, mostly in poor countries. Th
Study in mice moves researchers closer to staph vaccine

Study in mice moves researchers closer to staph vaccine

Health
Dec. 24 (UPI) -- Staph infections pose a serious health threat -- particularly since they are often resistant to many currently available antibiotics. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis think they may be one step closer to developing a vaccine that can prevent the spread of these deadly bugs. Their findings were published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Across the globe, staph infections have become a pervasive health threat because of increasing antibiotic resistance," senior investigator Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg, director of the Division of Pediatric Critical Care at Washington University, said in a press release. "Despite the medical community's best efforts, the superbug has shown a consistent ability to elude treatment" Staph bac...