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Tag: vaccine

DNA vaccine shows promising, long-term results against Ebola virus

DNA vaccine shows promising, long-term results against Ebola virus

Health
Oct. 10 (UPI) -- A synthetic DNA vaccine is showing immediate and long-term promising results against the Ebola virus in preclinical animal research. Scientists at The Wistar Institute Vaccine and Immunotherapy Centers designed optimized synthetic DNA vaccine candidates that target a virus surface protein called glycoprotein. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. The Zaire Ebolavirus infection causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with a 50 percent fatality rate. Ebola, which is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission, first appeared in 1976 in what is now, Nzara, South Sudan, and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. "Synthetic non-viral based DNA technology allows for rapid vac...
FDA expands use of cervical cancer vaccine up to age 45

FDA expands use of cervical cancer vaccine up to age 45

Health
U.S. regulators Friday expanded the use of Merck's cervical cancer vaccine to adults up to age 45. The vaccine was previously only for preteens and young adults through 26. The Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil 9 for women and men through 45. The vaccine protects against the human papilloma virus — or HPV — which can cause cervical cancer, certain other cancers and genital warts. The virus is very common and is spread through sex. In most cases, HPV doesn't cause any problems, but some infections persist and eventually lead to cancer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates about 14 million people become newly infected with HPV each year, mostly teens and young adults. Gardasil was originally approved for girls in 2006 and later for boys — ...
Flu season is here: What you need to know about the flu vaccine

Flu season is here: What you need to know about the flu vaccine

Health
It’s the start of fall, which means flu season is here. Last year, flu hospitalizations were the highest they’ve ever been; 106 out of every 100,000 people were hospitalized for the flu in the 2017-18 season, with people over age 65 accounting for 58 percent of those hospitalizations and 180 pediatric deaths. Flu and the common cold can both make you feel crummy, but they are caused by different viruses. Colds are usually milder and do not result in serious health problems associated with the flu, like pneumonia or hospitalizations. Right now, being prepared is the best thing you can do before the season hits. Here’s what you need to know. Flu season may start as early as October in North America, but generally, it begins sometime in the fall and ends in March. Th...
Officials push flu vaccine after most deadly season in four decades

Officials push flu vaccine after most deadly season in four decades

Health
Sept. 27 (UPI) -- One year after a severe flu season, medical personnel are giving it their best shot to reduce hospitalizations and deaths by giving a boost to vaccines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are aiming for significantly higher rates of flu vaccination for the 2018-2019 flu season following the most deadly season since 1976, the first year total seasonal flu deaths were reported. Last year there was an estimated 900,000 hospitalizations, and more than 80,000 deaths, according to new data released by the CDC on Thursday. The previous high for regular flu season deaths was 56,000. The number of people vaccinated dropped last year by 1.1 percentage point to 57.9 percent -- far below the goal of 80 percent. With the new vaccine now available, U.S. government officia...
Vaccine, drug combo promising against HPV-related cancers

Vaccine, drug combo promising against HPV-related cancers

Health
Sept. 27 (UPI) -- Combining a tumor-specific vaccine with an immune checkpoint inhibitor shrank tumors in one third of patients with incurable cancer related to HPV, according to a phase II clinical trial. Participants were injected with the vaccine ISA101, which targets important peptides from a cancer-promoting HPV16 genotype of human papillomavirus, and nivolumab, a drug that blocks activation of PD-1 on T cells. The findings were published Thursday in the Journal of the Medical Association Oncology. "That encouraging response rate is about twice the rate produced by PD1 checkpoint inhibitors in previous clinical trials, so these results will lead to larger, randomized clinical trials of this combination," principal investigator Dr. Bonnie Glisson, a professor of thoracic/head and neck...