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Tag: Veterans

New veterans have 93% higher risk for suicide than general public, study finds

New veterans have 93% higher risk for suicide than general public, study finds

Health
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- New military veterans are 93% more likely to die by suicide than the general public, an analysis published Friday by JAMA Network Open found. The assessment, which focused on nearly 1.9 million service members that left the military between 2010 and 2017, found that more than 3,000 service of them died by suicide, with the vast majority of them -- just over 94% -- men. Advertisement The study found men were more than three times as likely to die by suicide after transitioning to civilian life than women, the researchers said. Younger members, 17 to 19 years old, were 4.5 times as likely to die by suicide after leaving the service than older veterans -- those 40 years old and older -- according to the researchers. "National leaders at the highest levels of the U.S. gover...
After earlier confusion, filing requirements are waived and veterans will get stimulus checks automatically

After earlier confusion, filing requirements are waived and veterans will get stimulus checks automatically

Finance
Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin speaks with President Donald J. Trump and members of the coronavirus task force during a briefing in response to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic on Thursday, April 02, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)The Washington PostAmericans generally are required to file a tax return in order to receive their money, which the IRS began issuing over the past several days. The IRS uses that information to determine the eligibility for and the size of the payments, which can total up to $ 1,200 per individual and $ 2,400 per married couple. But many veterans and their survivors who rely solely on government benefits, such as disability payments from Veterans Affairs, do not typically have to submit a&nbs...
Few veterans use weight loss medicine despite great need, study says

Few veterans use weight loss medicine despite great need, study says

Health
May 17 (UPI) -- Many veterans desperately need weight loss management, but few actually get medical help for the problem, a new study says. Fewer than 1 percent of those vets use them, despite the growing weight problem within the group, according to research published Wednesday in Obesity. About 41 percent of veterans are obese and 37 percent are overweight, according to the study. Obesity can increase the risk for diabetes, depression, hypertension, coronary heart disease and obstructive sleep apnea and various cancer, all of which pose a higher death risk. "The comparably low rates of use of medicine in and outside the VA are surprising," said Varsha G. Vimalananda, a researcher from the Edith Nourse Roger Memorial Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Massachusetts. "Insurance coverage ...
Trump ousts Shulkin from Veterans Affairs, taps his doctor

Trump ousts Shulkin from Veterans Affairs, taps his doctor

Health
President Donald Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin on Wednesday and nominated White House doctor Ronny Jackson to replace him in the wake of a bruising ethics scandal and a mounting rebellion within the agency. A Navy rear admiral, Jackson is a surprise choice to succeed Shulkin, a former Obama administration official and the first non-veteran ever to head the VA. Trump had been considering replacements for Shulkin for weeks, but had not been known to be considering Jackson for the role. In a statement, Trump praised Jackson as "highly trained and qualified." It was a decision that signaled Trump chose to go with someone he knows and trusts, rather than the candidate with the longest resume, to run a massive agency facing huge bureaucratic challenges. Jackson has served...
Study: Prazosin fails to alleviate PTSD in military veterans

Study: Prazosin fails to alleviate PTSD in military veterans

Health
Feb. 8 (UPI) -- The drug prazosin failed to effectively alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans, according to a trial conducted by researchers with the Department of Veterans Affairs.Although the drug has been effective in controlling nightmares or improving sleep quality associated with PTSD, the researchers concluded it was no better than a placebo, according to results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Prazosin, which includes trade names Minipress, Vasoflex, Lentopres and Hypovase, is also used to treat high blood pressure and anxiety.About 11 percent to 20 percent of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have been diagnosed with PTSD, according to the activist group DoSomething.org.Dr. Murray Raskind, a lead researcher on the trial, told Stat ...