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Anti-government protests turn violent in Romania

Anti-government protests turn violent in Romania

World
Aug. 11 (UPI) -- Demonstrators clashed with police on Friday as an anti-government protest in Romania's capital, Bucharest, turned violent. Tens of thousands showed up for the rally, which called on Romanians living abroad to return home to protest what they say is a corrupt government. Chief complaints among the demonstrators are legislative changes that many say will weaken the rule of law. "We want democracy and laws that defend citizens, not politicians," Moise Maracine, a protester who flew from Britain, where he lives and owns a business, told The New York Times. As angry crowds shouted for government officials to resign, demonstrators clashed with officials. Some threw bottles and rocks at the police, prompting law enforcement to fire tear gas into the crowd. More than 240 people ...
Martian moons Phobos and Deimos carved out by violent impact

Martian moons Phobos and Deimos carved out by violent impact

Science
April 18 (UPI) -- The Martian moons Phobos and Deimos were formed after a large object struck the Red Planet a few billion years ago, according to a new model developed by scientists at the Southwest Research Institute.Scientists have considered a number of origin scenarios for Phobos and Deimos, including the possibility that the satellites are asteroids captured by Mars' gravity.The most promising formation theory is one involving an impact and an equatorial disk of debris. The two small moons formed from the disk of rocky fragments. But until now, attempts to model such a scenario have failed to convince."Ours is the first self-consistent model to identify the type of impact needed to lead to the formation of Mars' two small moons," Robin Canup, an associate vice president in the SwRI S...
'Oumuamua: 'space cigar's' tumble hints at violent past

'Oumuamua: 'space cigar's' tumble hints at violent past

Science
The space interloper 'Oumuamua is spinning chaotically and will carry on doing so for more than a billion years. That is the conclusion of new Belfast research that has examined in detail the light bouncing off the cigar-shaped asteroid from outside our Solar System. "At some point or another it's been in a collision," says Dr Wes Fraser from Queen's University. His team's latest study is featured in Sunday's Sky At Night episode on the BBC and published in Nature Astronomy. It is yet another intriguing finding about this strange object that has fascinated scientists since its discovery back in October. 'Oumuamua comes from a different star system. Its path across the sky confirms it does not originate in our solar neighbourhood. Initially, it was thought the object could be a comet, but i...