News That Matters

Tag: virus

Climate change is helping spread a deadly virus among frogs in Britain

Climate change is helping spread a deadly virus among frogs in Britain

Science
May 10 (UPI) -- Earth's warming climate is encouraging the spread of a virus causing a deadly epidemic among common frogs, Rana temporaria. When a team of researchers in England compared the records of mass-mortality events linked to Ranavirus with climate patterns, they found rising temperatures were associated with an increased risk of a viral outbreak. If temperatures continue to rise, scientists expect Ranavirus outbreaks to become more severe and occur more frequently. In addition to analyzing weather and frog mortality data compiled by the Met Office and Froglife's Frog Mortality Project, scientists also studied cell cultures and live models in the lab. Their tests confirmed warmer temperatures increased the likelihood of Ranavirus triggering an outbreak of the fatal disease. The l...
London man clear of HIV virus after transplant

London man clear of HIV virus after transplant

Technology
By Lucia Binding, news reporter A man in London has become the second person to be clear of HIV after a stem cell transplant, doctors have said.Until now, Timothy Ray Brown from the US was the only person thought to have been cured of HIV after undergoing a transplant in Berlin 12 years ago. The unidentified man in the UK, who is being called "the London patient", received bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection.Almost three years on, and more than 18 months after coming off antiretroviral drugs, highly sensitive tests show no signs of the man's previous HIV infection."There is no virus there that we can measure. We can't detect anything," said Ravindra Gupta, a professor and HIV biologist who treated th...
DNA vaccine shows promising, long-term results against Ebola virus

DNA vaccine shows promising, long-term results against Ebola virus

Health
Oct. 10 (UPI) -- A synthetic DNA vaccine is showing immediate and long-term promising results against the Ebola virus in preclinical animal research. Scientists at The Wistar Institute Vaccine and Immunotherapy Centers designed optimized synthetic DNA vaccine candidates that target a virus surface protein called glycoprotein. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. The Zaire Ebolavirus infection causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with a 50 percent fatality rate. Ebola, which is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission, first appeared in 1976 in what is now, Nzara, South Sudan, and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. "Synthetic non-viral based DNA technology allows for rapid vac...
HIV genome helps determine antibodies formed in people with the virus

HIV genome helps determine antibodies formed in people with the virus

Health
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- Researchers found that HIV itself plays a major role in determining which antibodies are formed in people, which may be important for developing a vaccine against it. A Swiss research team led by the University of Zurich and University Hospital Zurich has been searching for the factors that play a role in these antibodies' production. Their findings were published Monday in the journal Nature. HIV, which stands for human immunodeficiency virus, spreads through certain body fluids that attack the body's immune system, including T cells. Over time, these infections take advantage of a weak immune system and become acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Previously identified factors that played a role in the body's immune response were: the virus load and the diversit...
CRISPR gene editing possible without using a virus, scientists say

CRISPR gene editing possible without using a virus, scientists say

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- Scientists have figured out a way to use genetically reprogram human immune cells without using viruses to insert DNA, as the CRISPR method of gene editing has traditionally required. In a study published recently in Nature, researchers at the University of California San Francisco show a new CRISPR technique involving T cells could help develop new and safer treatments for cancer, autoimmunity and rare inherited disorders. "This is a rapid, flexible method that can be used to alter, enhance, and reprogram T cells so we can give them the specificity we want to destroy cancer, recognize infections, or tamp down the excessive immune response seen in autoimmune disease," senior author Dr. Alex Marson, associate professor of microbiology and immunology, said in a press relea...