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Tag: warming

Global warming boosts century-to-century variability, study finds

Global warming boosts century-to-century variability, study finds

Science
Oct. 12 (UPI) -- As Earth gets hotter, century-to-century climate variability increases, according to a new study. When scientists compared the century-scale climate variability during the last interglacial period, between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago, with variability during the last 11,700 years, they found a significant correlation between warming and variability. During the last interglacial, or Eemian stage, the planet experienced significant Arctic warming. The average global temperature was between 3 and 11 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average. In other words, Earth was about as warm as climate scientists expect the planet to get by the end of the century -- should global warming continue unabated. Earth not only experienced higher temperatures during the last i...
Global warming increases risk of heat stress for outdoor workers

Global warming increases risk of heat stress for outdoor workers

Science
Oct. 8 (UPI) -- Every year, a few hundred people in the United States die as a result of heat exposure, making heat stress the leading cause of weather-related deaths -- deadlier than lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes and floods. Outdoor workers are especially vulnerable to heat, and their risk of exposure to heat stress conditions is likely to increase as the effects of climate change progress. That's why several advocacy groups, including Public Citizen and the United Farm Workers, have petitioned the federal government to establish stronger -- and specific -- heat stress-related protections for outdoor workers. Heat stress conditions are produced by the combination of high temperatures and high humidity. When it's humid, sweat can't evaporate efficiently, limiting the body's natural abi...
Global warming could spur more and hungrier crop-eating bugs

Global warming could spur more and hungrier crop-eating bugs

Technology
A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if climate change isn't stopped, said study lead author Curtis Deutsch, a University of Washington climate scientist. The study looked at the damage bugs like the European corn borer and the Asiatic rice borer could do as temperatures rise. It found that many of them will increase in number at key times for crops. The hotter weather will also speed up their metabolism so they'll eat more, the researchers report in Thursday's journal Science . Their predictions are based on computer simulations of bug and weather activity. "There's going to...
Slowing Gulf Stream current to boost warming for 20 years

Slowing Gulf Stream current to boost warming for 20 years

Science
The prospect of the Gulf Stream slowing down and even stopping altogether has worried many experts in recent years. Some believed that this would cause a rapid cooling around the world with resulting global chaos.But a new study finds the Gulf Stream go-slow will have a significant impact on planetary temperatures, but not in a chilled out way.The Gulf Stream is an ocean current that keeps the UK warmer than it would be given its latitude alone.Researchers say a slower current will carry less heat down to the deep oceans meaning more will enter the atmosphere.Worries over the fate of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Amoc), of which the Gulf Stream is part, were graphically illustrated in the 2004 film, The Day After Tomorrow. It focused on...
Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests rising temperatures are encouraging antibiotic resistance in cities across the United States. Until now, health researchers assumed antibiotic resistance was primarily the result of overprescription and overuse. But a new study suggests climate change is also to blame. "The effects of climate are increasingly being recognized in a variety of infectious diseases, but so far as we know this is the first time it has been implicated in the distribution of antibiotic resistance over geographies," Derek MacFadden, an infectious disease specialist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, said in a news release. "We also found a signal that the associations between antibiotic resistance and temperature could be increasing over time." MacFadden and ...