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Tag: warming

Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Technology
Global warming during a "greenhouse interval" ultimately led to the start of the human race, scientists believe.New research suggests that sea temperatures of around 25C (77F) and a lack of permanent polar ice sheets fuelled an explosion of species diversity that eventually led to the human race.Scientists made the discovery while looking for clues in tiny fossil shells in blocks of Shropshire limestone thought to be around 510 million years old.The timeframe is referred to as the Cambrian explosion, when representatives of all the major animal groups first appeared.The surge in diversity allowed life to evolve into a multitude of complex forms, including fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.Scientists previously thought the Cambrian explosion must have been fuelled by warm temperatures, but ...
For reef fish, tolerance for warming waters comes from their parents' DNA

For reef fish, tolerance for warming waters comes from their parents' DNA

Science
May 1 (UPI) -- New research suggests reef fish can inherit the genetic tools to adapt to rising water temperatures.In lab tests, scientists found the offspring of parents who were exposed to water temperatures increases were better able to adapt water temperatures increases than fish spawned by parents exposed to stable temperatures."When parents are exposed to an increase in water temperature, we found that their offspring improved their performance in these otherwise stressful conditions by selectively modifying their epigenome," Philip Munday, researcher with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University, said in a news release.Epigenetic changes in the DNA are biochemical changes that alter the expression of genes, causing certain genes to be turned on o...
Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Technology
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers who published in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. Sea level rise is caused by warming of the ocean and melting from glaciers and ice sheets. The research, based on 25 years of satellite data, shows that pace has quickened, mainly from the melting of massive ice sheets. It confirms scientists' computer simulations and is in line with predictions from the United Nations, which releases regular climate change reports. "It's a big deal" because the projected sea level ...
The Latest: States warming up net-neutrality lawsuits

The Latest: States warming up net-neutrality lawsuits

Technology
The Latest on the FCC's vote on eliminating net-neutrality protections for the internet (all times local): 2:10 p.m. State attorneys general are now threatening lawsuits against the federal government's repeal of "net neutrality" rules. New York's attorney general says he'll lead a multistate lawsuit to stop the Federal Communications Commission's rollback of rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet. Democrat Eric Schneiderman has been investigating fake public comments submitted to the FCC during the net neutrality comment process. Schneiderman says his analysis shows 2 million comments stole the identities of real Americans, including dead people and children. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, said at a July FCC meeting that the raw number of comments wasn't as important as...
Study shows impact of global warming on coffee production

Study shows impact of global warming on coffee production

Science
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- A recent study by the University of Vermont found global warming could reduce coffee growing areas in Latin America by as much as 88 percent by 2050.Researchers from the University of Vermont's Gund Institute for Environment found climate change will continue to negatively impact coffee production, as well as bee populations, essential to coffee farming."Coffee is one of the most valuable commodities on earth, and needs a suitable climate and pollinating bees to produce well," Taylor Ricketts, director of the UVM's Gund Institute for Environment, said in a press release. "This is the first study to show how both will likely change under global warming -- in ways that will hit coffee producers hard."The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of S...