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Tag: warming

Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Technology
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers who published in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. Sea level rise is caused by warming of the ocean and melting from glaciers and ice sheets. The research, based on 25 years of satellite data, shows that pace has quickened, mainly from the melting of massive ice sheets. It confirms scientists' computer simulations and is in line with predictions from the United Nations, which releases regular climate change reports. "It's a big deal" because the projected sea level ...
The Latest: States warming up net-neutrality lawsuits

The Latest: States warming up net-neutrality lawsuits

Technology
The Latest on the FCC's vote on eliminating net-neutrality protections for the internet (all times local): 2:10 p.m. State attorneys general are now threatening lawsuits against the federal government's repeal of "net neutrality" rules. New York's attorney general says he'll lead a multistate lawsuit to stop the Federal Communications Commission's rollback of rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet. Democrat Eric Schneiderman has been investigating fake public comments submitted to the FCC during the net neutrality comment process. Schneiderman says his analysis shows 2 million comments stole the identities of real Americans, including dead people and children. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, said at a July FCC meeting that the raw number of comments wasn't as important as...
Study shows impact of global warming on coffee production

Study shows impact of global warming on coffee production

Science
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- A recent study by the University of Vermont found global warming could reduce coffee growing areas in Latin America by as much as 88 percent by 2050.Researchers from the University of Vermont's Gund Institute for Environment found climate change will continue to negatively impact coffee production, as well as bee populations, essential to coffee farming."Coffee is one of the most valuable commodities on earth, and needs a suitable climate and pollinating bees to produce well," Taylor Ricketts, director of the UVM's Gund Institute for Environment, said in a press release. "This is the first study to show how both will likely change under global warming -- in ways that will hit coffee producers hard."The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of S...
Galapagos seabird's numbers expected to shrink with ocean warming

Galapagos seabird's numbers expected to shrink with ocean warming

Science
Aug. 25 (UPI) -- A new study at Wake Forest University suggests the loss of sardines around the Galapagos Islands because of rising ocean temperatures has had a profound effect on the Nazca booby, and the effect is expected to get worse.The Nazca booby is a tropical seabird whose diet consists primarily of sardines.Rising ocean temperatures around the Galapagos Islands are expected to rise significantly making the water too warm for a key prey species of sardines to tolerate.The study, published Aug. 23 in Plos One, is an analysis of how the absence of sardines has effected the diet, breeding and survival of Nazca boobies. The new study is part of a long-term study at Isla Espanola in the Galapagos Islands for more than 30 years.Researchers found that in 1997 sardines disappeared from Nazc...
Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals

Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals

Technology
The email arrived in mid-June, seeking to explode any notion that global warming might turn our Arctic expedition into a summer cruise. "The most important piece of clothing to pack is good, sturdy and warm boots. There is going to be snow and ice on the deck of the icebreaker," it read. "Quality boots are key." The Associated Press was joining international researchers on a month-long, 10,000 kilometer (6,200-mile) journey to document the impact of climate change on the forbidding ice and frigid waters of the Far North. But once the ship entered the fabled Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and the Pacific, there would be nowhere to stop for supplies, no port to shelter in and no help for hundreds of miles if things went wrong. A change in the weather might cause the mercury to drop ...