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Tag: warming

Slowing Gulf Stream current to boost warming for 20 years

Slowing Gulf Stream current to boost warming for 20 years

Science
The prospect of the Gulf Stream slowing down and even stopping altogether has worried many experts in recent years. Some believed that this would cause a rapid cooling around the world with resulting global chaos.But a new study finds the Gulf Stream go-slow will have a significant impact on planetary temperatures, but not in a chilled out way.The Gulf Stream is an ocean current that keeps the UK warmer than it would be given its latitude alone.Researchers say a slower current will carry less heat down to the deep oceans meaning more will enter the atmosphere.Worries over the fate of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Amoc), of which the Gulf Stream is part, were graphically illustrated in the 2004 film, The Day After Tomorrow. It focused on...
Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests rising temperatures are encouraging antibiotic resistance in cities across the United States. Until now, health researchers assumed antibiotic resistance was primarily the result of overprescription and overuse. But a new study suggests climate change is also to blame. "The effects of climate are increasingly being recognized in a variety of infectious diseases, but so far as we know this is the first time it has been implicated in the distribution of antibiotic resistance over geographies," Derek MacFadden, an infectious disease specialist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, said in a news release. "We also found a signal that the associations between antibiotic resistance and temperature could be increasing over time." MacFadden and ...
Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Technology
Global warming during a "greenhouse interval" ultimately led to the start of the human race, scientists believe.New research suggests that sea temperatures of around 25C (77F) and a lack of permanent polar ice sheets fuelled an explosion of species diversity that eventually led to the human race.Scientists made the discovery while looking for clues in tiny fossil shells in blocks of Shropshire limestone thought to be around 510 million years old.The timeframe is referred to as the Cambrian explosion, when representatives of all the major animal groups first appeared.The surge in diversity allowed life to evolve into a multitude of complex forms, including fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.Scientists previously thought the Cambrian explosion must have been fuelled by warm temperatures, but ...
For reef fish, tolerance for warming waters comes from their parents' DNA

For reef fish, tolerance for warming waters comes from their parents' DNA

Science
May 1 (UPI) -- New research suggests reef fish can inherit the genetic tools to adapt to rising water temperatures.In lab tests, scientists found the offspring of parents who were exposed to water temperatures increases were better able to adapt water temperatures increases than fish spawned by parents exposed to stable temperatures."When parents are exposed to an increase in water temperature, we found that their offspring improved their performance in these otherwise stressful conditions by selectively modifying their epigenome," Philip Munday, researcher with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University, said in a news release.Epigenetic changes in the DNA are biochemical changes that alter the expression of genes, causing certain genes to be turned on o...
Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Satellites show warming is accelerating sea level rise

Technology
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers who published in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. Sea level rise is caused by warming of the ocean and melting from glaciers and ice sheets. The research, based on 25 years of satellite data, shows that pace has quickened, mainly from the melting of massive ice sheets. It confirms scientists' computer simulations and is in line with predictions from the United Nations, which releases regular climate change reports. "It's a big deal" because the projected sea level ...