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Tag: warming

Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Science
Jan. 1 (UPI) -- Many communities and industries utilize frozen rivers for transportation purposes during the heart of the winter, but new research suggests the planet's rivers are likely to spend fewer and fewer days frozen solid each year as temperatures continue to rise. In addition to supporting transportation networks, frozen rivers also curb the release of carbon dioxide from freshwater into the atmosphere. But just like glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice and frozen tundra, frozen rivers are vulnerable to accelerated melt rates. To find out how river ice is being affected globally by climate change, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compiled and analyzed nearly half a million satellite images of major rivers of the last three-plus decades. "We used more than 4...
Healing the ozone layer helped slow global warming

Healing the ozone layer helped slow global warming

Science
Dec. 6 (UPI) -- The hole in the ozone layer isn't yet gone, but it's been slowly shrinking for the last few decades, mostly thanks to the Montreal Protocol, passed in 1987, which helped phase out the use of ozone-eating chlorofluorocarbons around the world. New research suggests the Montreal Protocol also helped slow global warming. Chlorofluorocarbons, a class of chemicals that destroy the ozone layer, are also greenhouse gases. For the new study, published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters, scientists calculated the amount of warming that was prevented by slowing the release of CFCs into Earth's atmosphere. The analysis showed that by mid-century, Earth will be at least 1 degree Celsius cooler than it would have been without the Montreal Protocol. "By mass CFCs ar...
Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Technology
The world has gotten hotter, lost trillions of tons of ice and suffered more weather disasters since climate negotiations startedBy BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science WriterDecember 1, 2019, 10:05 AM3 min read Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown. The first United Nations diplomatic conference to tackle climate change was in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Here’s what’s happened to Earth since: — The carbon dioxide level in the air has jumped from about 358 parts per million to nearly 412, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That’s a 15% rise in 27 yea
Global warming is causing moths in the tropics to shrink

Global warming is causing moths in the tropics to shrink

Science
Oct. 11 (UPI) -- As temperatures rise, vulnerable species, including insects like moths, move to higher elevations. While chasing moth species up the mountains of Borneo's national parks, scientists from the University of York realized the insects were also getting smaller. Researchers turned to earlier surveys to confirm what their eyes were telling them. Moth surveys conducted on Borneo's Mount Kinabalu between 1965 and 2007 revealed significant reduction the length of moth wings. The analysis was detailed this week in the journal Nature Communications. Scientists determined that the reduction in wing sizes was explained by the shrinking of moth bodies and the arrival of smaller species at higher and higher elevations. If the changes in body size continue, entire ecosystems could be af...
Climate change: Warming to drive ‘robust increase’ in UK flooding

Climate change: Warming to drive ‘robust increase’ in UK flooding

Science
Coastal areas in the UK and Northern Europe will experience an increase in "compound flooding" in coming decades say researchers. These events, where storm surges and heavy rainfall combine, will become more common thanks to rising global temperatures. Devon, Cornwall and the Bristol channel may become "hotspots" with events seen more than once every six years. The study is published in the journal Science Advances. Researchers say that floods on the Avon in Bristol in 2014 and in Ravenna in Italy in 2015 are both good examples of compound events that have caused significant losses to people and property.These events are marked by a combination of storm surge and heavy rainfall, sometimes driven by the same low pressure system. Storm surges can be made wo...