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Tag: Water

Tear gas and water cannon fired at Hong Kong protesters

Tear gas and water cannon fired at Hong Kong protesters

World
Riot police in Hong Kong have fired water cannon, tear gas and pepper spray during clashes with anti-government protesters.The latest violent confrontations, which saw some demonstrators hurl petrol bombs at official buildings, follow weeks of pro-democracy unrest in the city. Image: Petrol bombs were thrown by some anti-government protesters It will fuel fears of escalating violence in the run up to China's National Day on 1 October, marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic.Thousands of protesters, many clad in black with umbrellas and carrying pro-democracy posters, sang songs and chanted Stand With Hong Kong, Fight For Freedom as they marched on government offices, in defiance of a police ban. ...
CDC study to track dangerous ‘forever chemicals’ in drinking water

CDC study to track dangerous ‘forever chemicals’ in drinking water

Health
Sept. 27 (UPI) -- The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention announced a new multi-site study this week that will investigate the health effects of drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. The new study -- the first to examine multiple sites of PFAS contamination nationwide -- was authorized by the National Defense Authorization Acts of 2018 and 2019 to provide information to communities about the health effects of PFAS exposure. The CDC will award initial grants totaling $ 7 million to begin the study, with a goal of understanding the relationship between PFAS exposure and health outcomes in differing populations. The study will recruit at least 2,000 children ages 4 to 17, and 6,000 adults over age 18, who have been exposed to PFAS-contaminated...
Planned power plants in Asia likely to face water shortages

Planned power plants in Asia likely to face water shortages

Science
Sept. 20 (UPI) -- Climate activists have raised concerns about the number of power plants planned for development in Asia, but the threat of climate change appears to be just one reason to think twice about building new power plants in the region. According to a new study, water shortages in Asia could make it increasingly difficult to cool new power plants. "One of the impacts of climate change is that the weather is changing, which leads to more extreme events -- more torrential downpours and more droughts," Jeffrey Bielicki, an associate professor of civil engineering and public policy at Ohio State University, said in a news release. "The power plants -- coal, nuclear and natural gas power plants -- require water for cooling, so when you don't have the rain, you don't have the stream...
Water discovery means ‘super-Earth’ could support life

Water discovery means ‘super-Earth’ could support life

Technology
Water vapour has been discovered in the atmosphere of an enormous Earth-like planet already known to have habitable temperatures, which scientists say means it could support life.The unprecedented detection was made on K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of our home world. It is known as an exoplanet because it orbits a star outside the solar system, and is the first of its kind that is known to feature both water and temperatures suitable for life to exist.Those hoping to jump ship will be disappointed to hear that K2-18b is a whopping 110 light years from Earth, and may also have been exposed to dangerous radiation due to its highly active red dwarf star. Image: The exoplanet is the first of its kind that is known to feature both water and t...
Water found for first time on potentially habitable planet

Water found for first time on potentially habitable planet

Science
Astronomers have for the first time discovered water in the atmosphere of a planet orbiting within the habitable zone of a distant star. The finding makes the world - which is called K2-18b - a plausible candidate in the search for alien life.Within 10 years, new space telescopes might be able to determine whether K2-18b's atmosphere contains gases that could be produced by living organisms.Details were published in the scientific journal Nature Astronomy.The lead scientist, Prof Giovanna Tinetti of University College London (UCL) described the discovery as "mind blowing"."This is the first time that we have detected water on a planet in the habitable zone around a star where the temperature is potentially compatible with the pre...