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Tag: Water

Erin Brockovich: California water battle ‘woke me up’ 

Erin Brockovich: California water battle ‘woke me up’ 

Science
Courtesy Erin BrockovichErin Brockovich talks about her new case on "forever chemicals" in our water, and their potential wide-spread health impact. This story contains strong language.The name Erin Brockovich has become synonymous with those who investigate and hold corporations to account for polluting people's water.Actor Julia Robert's sassy film portrayal of the single mum's key role in winning the largest settlement ever awarded at the time for a direct-action lawsuit against Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), made her a household name. She did this without legal, medical, or scientific training. The case alleged contamination of the water with the carcinogen hexavalent chromium, in the southern California town of Hinkley. "Hinkley woke me up", says Brockovich. "Everyone sai...
Humans evolved to use water much more efficiently than apes

Humans evolved to use water much more efficiently than apes

Science
March 5 (UPI) -- The story of humans' descent from the trees -- the journey from ape to early human -- often focuses on the development of big brains, dextrous hands and bipedal gait, but new research suggests another difference may have been equally important: water efficiency. In a first-of-its-kind study, published Friday in the journal Current Biology, researchers were able to show that humans process water much more efficiently than our closest relatives. Advertisement The trait may have allowed early humans to venture farther and farther from water sources, exploring and adapting to new environs. Until now, scientists didn't have the necessary data to compare the water conservation capabilities of chimpanzees and gorillas with those of modern humans. "Getting real data on this requ...
Earth’s water cycle is increasingly dictated by humans

Earth’s water cycle is increasingly dictated by humans

Science
March 3 (UPI) -- For the first time, scientists have quantified the influence of humans on surface water storage, a key component of the global water cycle. Most investigations of the impacts of human activities on hydrological patterns are focused on specific watersheds or freshwater bodies, but for the latest study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, scientists zoomed all the way out, adopting a global view. Advertisement The findings revealed the human species as the dominant regulator of surface water storage on Earth. Using surface water level measurements collected by NASA's ICESat-2 satellite altimeter, launched in 2018, scientists compiled a massive, global dataset for seasonal water level variability. The observations, captured by ICESat-2 and organized by the research t...
Marsquakes, water on other planets, asteroid hunting highlight 2020 in space

Marsquakes, water on other planets, asteroid hunting highlight 2020 in space

Science
Dec. 25 (UPI) -- In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic demanded the attention of thousands of scientists, but they had a lot to look in to, including vaccines and treatments for the novel coronavirus. But not all science remained earthbound. Advertisement Many scientists kept their attention on the skies, searching for answers to cosmic mysteries and preparing for the next chapter in the history of human spaceflight. Here are five of the most astounding space-related scientific breakthroughs and discoveries made over the last 12 months. These discoveries have set the stage for even more compelling advances in the year ahead -- a year during which NASA hopes to fly a helicopter on Mars and send its first Artemis test flights to the moon. Hottest picture in space While scientists have insight into...

Mexico rights agency says migrants held without light, water

World
Mexico's National Human Rights Commission says migrants are being held at some government facilities without proper sanitary measures, with migrants with COVID-19 mixed in with those without symptomsByThe Associated PressOctober 23, 2020, 9:35 PM• 1 min readMEXICO CITY -- Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission said Friday that some migrants are being held at some government facilities without proper sanitary measures, with migrants with COVID-19 mixed in with some without symptoms.The governmental commission said one facility in southern Chiapas state lacked enough face masks and hand gel, and said social distancing measures are not being followed.It said some Central Americans are being held at another improvised facility that doesn’t have electrical service or running water.There, 19 ...