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Tag: Water

Southern Water punished over ‘shocking’ wastewater spills

Southern Water punished over ‘shocking’ wastewater spills

Business
Southern Water has been hit with a record £126m punishment for spills of wastewater into the environment from its sewage plants and for deliberately misreporting its performance.The penalty will see customers get a rebate of at least £61 each."What we found in this case is shocking," said Rachel Fletcher, the head of water regulator Ofwat, while Southern said it was "deeply sorry".The Environment Agency has launched a criminal investigation into the case.The Agency has the power to take court action if companies' actions hurt the natural environment.The EA would not confirm if the investigation was into Southern Water itself or individuals employed by the company.The investigation is understood to be at an early stage, with no court action imminent.When w
Collision that formed the moon also brought Earth water, planetary scientists claim

Collision that formed the moon also brought Earth water, planetary scientists claim

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- Without the moon and water, life on Earth wouldn't be possible. New research out of Germany suggests both were delivered by Theia, which collided with Earth 4.4 billion years ago. Scientists have long puzzled over the origins of Earth's water. Earth was formed in the inner solar system, and the inner solar system was dry. The solar system's wet materials were relegated to the outer solar system. Water-rich carbonaceous meteorites, for example, hail from the outer solar system. Non-carbonaceous meteorites from the inner solar system are without water. At some point during Earth's early history, carbonaceous materials delivered large quantities of water. But the details and timing of this delivery process aren't well understood. "We have used molybdenum isotopes to answer ...

Changing water flow leads to more bugs in Grand Canyon

Technology
Ted Kennedy sums up what he sees along the river in the Grand Canyon: "It's buggy out there." That is to say, an experiment to change the flow of water from a dam near the Arizona-Utah state line appeared to boost the number of aquatic insects that fish in the Colorado River eat. Scientists are hoping to better understand those results with a second bug flow experiment that started this month and will run through August. They found that releasing low, steady flows of water from Glen Canyon Dam over the weekend gives the eggs that bugs lay on rocks, wood or cattails just below the water's surface a better chance of survival. Otherwise, they might dry out and die within an hour. "It's a powerful reminder that flows really matter, that just a couple days a week of steady flow can illicit mas...