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Tag: wave

78-foot wave off New Zealand largest ever in Southern Hemisphere

78-foot wave off New Zealand largest ever in Southern Hemisphere

Science
May 11 (UPI) -- Scientists believe a 78-foot wave that formed off the coast of New Zealand this week is the largest wave ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere. A storm close to the Southern Ocean's Campbell Island, a low-pressure system and 65-knot winds helped create prime conditions for the wave to form. "To our knowledge, it is the largest wave ever recorded in the southern hemisphere," said Tom Durrant, senior oceanographer at New Zealand's MetService, adding the Southern Ocean is the "most energetic part" of the world's oceans for producing waves. A buoy recorded the 80-foot wave, but Durrant said the storm likely created bigger waves in other locations. The Southern Ocean comprises the southernmost waters of the world's ocean, the water surrounding Antarctica. Storms generated t...
Gravitational wave hunters bag fourth black-hole detection

Gravitational wave hunters bag fourth black-hole detection

Science
Scientists have detected another burst of gravitational waves coming from the merger of two black holes.The collision occurred nearly 2 billion years ago, but it was so far away that its shockwave has only just reached us.This is the fourth confirmed detection made by an international team investigating Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.Sheila Rowan of Glasgow University, UK, said the team was now on the threshold of a new understanding of black holes."It is tantalising to see this new story of how black holes formed and evolved through history of the cosmos," she told BBC News."This information is almost within our grasp but we are not quite there yet."Media playback is unsupported on your deviceGravitational waves are ripples in space and time caused by cataclysmic events in the Un...
Japanese scientists aim to turn ocean wave energy into electricity

Japanese scientists aim to turn ocean wave energy into electricity

Science
Sept. 22 (UPI) -- A team of researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan want to make the ocean an affordable source of renewable energy.Engineers at OIST have already harnessed the energy of ocean currents using underwater turbines. Now, the group is targeting the kinetic power of waves. The team is preparing to install turbines where the energy of the ocean is most apparent."Particularly in Japan, if you go around the beach you'll find many tetrapods," Tsumoru Shintake, a professor at OIST, said in a news release.Tetrapods are pyramid-like concrete structures designed to dampen the force of incoming waves and protect beaches from erosion.Shintake wants to replace tetrapods with turbines designed to convert wave energy into electricity."Surpr...