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Tag: weight

Disney star turned wild child Emma Ridley kickstarts weight loss journey for wedding no4

Disney star turned wild child Emma Ridley kickstarts weight loss journey for wedding no4

Entertainment
Before the internet, Insta and selfies, Britain had its very own Kim Kardashian socialite who ruled the roost in the 80s, 90s and noughties.Her name was Emma Ridley and she's still just as wild as ever.Squeezing her curves into a pair of bright pink leggings and plunging low-cut top, the 45-year-old Return to Oz star was spotted out in LA working up a sweat alongside her Belarusian trainer and Dancing with the Stars pro, Dzianis Marsian.The busty blonde looked hard at work as she was put through her paces for the gruelling workout in Studio City, just days after vowing to shed 30lbs after piling on the weight in recent years.Despite being renowned for her rebellious nature and partying ways – which saw her smoke marijuana at just 11-years-old and elope to Las Vegas at age 15 to marry...
This Is the 10-Day Cleanse Kim Kardashian Is Doing to Lose Weight for the Met Gala

This Is the 10-Day Cleanse Kim Kardashian Is Doing to Lose Weight for the Met Gala

Health
Kim Kardashian is going to be drinking a lot of smoothies over the next few days, as she gets ready for the Met Gala on May 7.Earlier this week on her app, the reality star wrote that she's doing the Sunfare Optimal Cleanse, a 10-day detox that involves a mix of pre-planned meals and shakes. "I have the Met Gala coming up and I've worked so hard working out, but I started eating a lot of sweets and I wanted to just change my food patterns to eat healthier and cut sugar out of my life as much as I can," she explained. "We always have sweets around and it's really hard when there are temptations everywhere."Sunfare doesn't provide nutritional information about its cleanse on its website. But at first glance, the plan looks ... kind of doable? Dishes like chicken primavera, Ita...
The 60/40 stock-bond weight rule needs to go on a crash diet

The 60/40 stock-bond weight rule needs to go on a crash diet

Finance
The classic 60/40 rule — an investor should put 60 percent of their portfolio in stocks and 40 percent in bonds — is popular for a reason: It has a good historical track record of delivering equity-like returns, while lessening the risk of serious annual portfolio drawdowns.Here are a few basic statistics that prove that point.Since 1928 — the first year data were available — a 60/40 portfolio of the S&P 500 and 10-Year Treasurys has delivered an average annual total return of 9 percent, or 78 percent of the total return for just the S&P 500 (11.5 percent). After inflation (using annual CPI) this translates to a 5.9 percent average total return for 60/40, or 70 percent of the average real returns for the S&P 500 (8.4 percent).More from Fixed Income Strategies:Where the bonds ar
Unintended weight loss identified as second highest cancer risk factor

Unintended weight loss identified as second highest cancer risk factor

Health
April 10 (UPI) -- When a person experiences an unintended weight loss, it is the second-highest predictor for some forms of cancer, according to an analysis of studies.Researchers at the universities of Oxford and Exeter analyzed the findings of 25 studies, incorporating data from more than 11.5 million patients collected between 1994 and 2015. They found that weight loss was linked with 10 types of cancer: prostate, colorectal, lung, gastro-esophageal, pancreatic, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, ovarian, myeloma, renal tract and biliary tree.Their analysis was published Monday in the British Journal of General Practice.Unintended weight loss in people older than 60 exceeded the 3 percent risk threshold for urgent investigation, according to guidelines by Britain's National Institute for Health Re...
Freezing the 'hunger nerve' could help with weight loss

Freezing the 'hunger nerve' could help with weight loss

Health
Weight loss can sometimes seem impossible because even after hard-won success, the pounds can creep back. “Ninety-five percent of people who embark on a diet on their own will fail or gain their weight back at the six- or 12-month mark,” Dr. David Prologo, an interventional radiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, said in a news release video. “The reason for this is the body’s backlash to the calorie restriction." Prologo recently conducted a trial that looked deeper into the issue, targeting the "hunger nerve" and its possible connection to one's ability to lose weight and keep it off. The “hunger nerve” -- also known as the posterior vagal trunk -- is a branch of the larger vagus nerve that works on the heart, lungs and GI system. When your stomach is empty, th