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Black Friday online sales were record $6.22B, tracking service reports

Black Friday online sales were record $6.22B, tracking service reports

Business
Nov. 24 (UPI) -- Online Black Friday companies racked up a record $ 6.22 billion in sales, up 23.6 percent from last year, according to Adobe Analytics. Adobe's data is based on an analysis of more than 1 trillion visits to retail sites and 55 million stock keeping units, or SKUs. The service, which tracks transactions from 80 of the top 100 internet retailers in the United States, reported 33.5 percent of the sales were via smartphones compared with 29.1 percent from mobile devices in 2017, according to a report by CNBC. Another tracking service, Salesforce.com, found 54 percent of all digital orders on Thanksgiving were made from a mobile device -- the first time the phone sales were more than computers. The phone usage is up from 15 percent as overall digital revenue incresed 18 percen...
Chemicals used in Deepwater Horizon spill were ineffective, study says

Chemicals used in Deepwater Horizon spill were ineffective, study says

Science
Nov. 1 (UPI) -- The chemical dispersants used to clean up oil after the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 were ineffective and unneeded, a new study says. Researchers report in a study published this week that dispersants used in the largest oil spill in U.S. history -- 210 million gallons of oil poured into the Gulf over 87 days after a BP oil rig exploded -- played no role in its clean up. BP injected 3,000 tons of a subsea dispersant called Corexit to push back the spread of oil and dissolve its particles. Instead, the researchers report, the dispersant was rendered ineffective due to the depth of the oil. And according to the study, the Corexit may have suppressed the growth of oil degrading sea bacteria, in addition to making the oil itself more toxic. "The resul...
Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Science
Sept. 4 (UPI) -- New analysis of fossil teeth have offered scientists new insights into the impacts of sea level rise on Jurassic food chains. Sea levels rose considerably over the course of the Jurassic period, the 56 million years between the Triassic and Cretaceous periods. As revealed by the fossil record, some species thrived, while others were pushed to the margins. To better understand the dynamics of this upheaval, scientists studied the shapes and sizes of teeth found among Jurassic strata along the coasts of England. All of the teeth were sourced from marine sediments representing an 18-million-year period when sea levels fluctuated dramatically. The owners of the ancient teeth belonged to a diverse food chain called the Jurassic Sub-Boreal Seaway. The analysis suggests the Jur...
Earth's earliest animals were strange frond-like sea creatures from the Ediacaran period

Earth's earliest animals were strange frond-like sea creatures from the Ediacaran period

Science
Aug. 20 (UPI) -- New fossil analysis suggests the planet's earliest known animals emerged at least 571 million years ago. The new study -- published this month in the journal Paleontology -- proves members of the Ediacaran biota are indeed animals and were diversifying for several million years before the acceleration of speciation known as the Cambrian explosion. Scientists recovered the first Stromatoveris psygmoglena fossil in the mid-20th century. The frond-like sea creature baffled paleontologists for decades. Stromatoveris psygmoglena hails from the Cambrian period, but dozens of similar blob-like fossil imprints have been found among older strata -- rocks from the Ediacaran period, which lasted from 635 to 542 million years ago. Until now, scientists have struggled to understand t...
How hats were placed atop the Easter Island statues

How hats were placed atop the Easter Island statues

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device The famous statues of Rapa Nui, or Easter Island, are best known for their deep-set eyes and long ears.They also sport impressive multi-tonne hats made from a different rock type.Quite how these pukao, as they are known, were transported and placed atop the statues has long been a puzzle.But now American archaeologists believe they have a clearer understanding. The giant hats were moved with minimal effort and resources using a ramp and rope technique, they say. "The fact that they successfully assembled these monuments is a clear signal of the engineering prowess of the prehistoric Rapanui people," said Sean Hixon, lead author and graduate student in anthropology, at Penn State. ...