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Tag: wildfires

Arctic wildfires: What’s caused huge swathes of flames to spread?

Arctic wildfires: What’s caused huge swathes of flames to spread?

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Wildfires are ravaging the Arctic, with areas of northern Siberia, northern Scandinavia, Alaska and Greenland engulfed in flames. Lightning frequently triggers fires in the region but this year they have been worsened by summer temperatures that are higher than average because of climate change.Plumes of smoke from the fires can be seen from space. Mark Parrington, a wildfires expert at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (Cams), described them as "unprecedented".How bad is it? There are hundreds of fires covering mostly uninhabited regions across eastern Russia, northern Scandinavia, Greenland and Alaska. ...
Wildfires disrupt moth-flower relationships, increasing risk of extinctions

Wildfires disrupt moth-flower relationships, increasing risk of extinctions

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- New research in Portugal suggests wildfires disrupt unique relationships between flowers and the specialized moths that pollinate them. In the wake of wildfire, wildflowers take advantage of an ecosystem cleared of larger plant species. Post-fire wildflower blooms prove a boon to daytime pollinators like bees and butterflies, but new research showed moths, which visit flowers at night, aren't so lucky. When scientists surveyed moths from sites across Portugal, they found the insects carry a surprising amount of pollen. In the spring, 95 percent of the moths captured and analyzed were carrying pollen. Scientists also found the pollen of 80 percent of the native flower species being carried by surveyed moths. However, pollen levels measured on moths caught in areas recentl...
California wildfires: Why are so many listed as missing?

California wildfires: Why are so many listed as missing?

World
Over the last few days the number of people unaccounted for in the deadly Camp Fire in northern California has skyrocketed to more than 1,200. The sudden jump has led to some confusion among locals and officials alike.The confirmed death toll of 76 is already a state record, so could this huge number of missing people really still be added to that?The answer is not so simple, as authorities in the worst-hit area, Butte County, have openly admitted.On Friday, when the list first soared to over 1,000, Sheriff Kory Honea described the database as "dynamic"."The information I am providing you is raw data and we find there is the likely possibility that the list contains duplicate names," the sheriff said on Friday.Officials say the l...
California wildfires: Trump visits state's deadliest blaze

California wildfires: Trump visits state's deadliest blaze

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device US President Donald Trump has visited California to survey the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state's history.The Camp Fire, in northern California, has killed at least 76 people.More than 1,200 people have been reported missing, although officials say that figure could fluctuate.In the destroyed town of Paradise, Mr Trump described the scene as "sad" and reiterated his disputed claim that poor forest management was to blame."We do have to do management maintenance and we'll be working also with environmental groups. I think everyone's seen the light," he said."I don't think we'll have this again to this extent," he added.Experts have pointed to the weather, climate change and popula...
Climate change: Worries over CO2 emissions from intensifying wildfires

Climate change: Worries over CO2 emissions from intensifying wildfires

Science
Rising numbers of extreme wildfires could result in a significant increase in CO₂ emissions, scientists warn.That could mean attaining the Paris climate agreement's goal of keeping global temperature rise well below 2C could become harder, they say. Present emission-cut pledges by countries are projected to increase the average global temperature rise by more than 3C by the end of the century.That would lead to dangerous climate change impacts, experts say.These include sea level rise, drought, wildfires, among other extreme events."We can't neglect the emissions from wildfires," says Ramon Vallejo, a scientist specialising on fire ecology with the University of Barcelona. "Particularly now that we are seeing intense wildfires all around the world....