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Tag: Wildlife

What the fire near Saddleworth Moor means for wildlife

What the fire near Saddleworth Moor means for wildlife

Science
The fire near Saddleworth Moor now spans over seven square miles, and local residents have been evacuated from some of the worst affected areas.But what does it mean for the wildlife that rely on the moor?"It couldn't have happened at a worse time," says David Hunt, an Upland Conservation Officer with the RSPB."This time of year we're in the middle of the bird breeding season. So ground nesting birds will inevitably have been affected."You could potentially still have birds on eggs. Although it's starting to get quite late; some smaller birds might be on second clutches," he told BBC News. The RSPB's Dove Stone site is home to an internationally important population of w...
Wildlife photo competition disqualifies 'stuffed anteater' image

Wildlife photo competition disqualifies 'stuffed anteater' image

Science
A winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition has been disqualified for featuring a taxidermy specimen. The image, known as The Night Raider, shows an anteater moving towards a termite mound in a Brazilian reserve. London's Natural History Museum, which runs the competition, says the use of stuffed animals breaches its rules. The photographer, Marcio Cabral, denies he faked the scene, and claims there is a witness who was with him on the day.Other photographers and tourists were in the park at the same time and therefore "it would be very unlikely anyone wouldn't see a stuffed animal being transported and placed carefully in this position", he told BBC News.But Roz Kidman Cox, the chair of judges for Wildlife Photographer of the Year (WPY), was stern in her criticism...
Feed the birds, but be aware of risks, say wildlife experts

Feed the birds, but be aware of risks, say wildlife experts

Science
Scientists are warning of the risks of wild birds spreading diseases when they gather at feeders in gardens.Experts led by Zoological Society of London say people should continue to feed birds, especially in winter, but should be aware of the risks.If birds look sick, food should be withdrawn temporarily, they say.The review of 25 years' worth of data identified emerging threats to garden birds. Finches, doves and pigeons are vulnerable to a parasite infection. Meanwhile, a form of bird pox is becoming more common, causing warty-like lumps on the bodies of great tits and other birds.Other disease threats, such as salmonella, appear to be declining."Our study shows how three of the most common diseases that affect British garden birds have changed both dramatically and unpredictably over th...
Wildlife secrets of Nigeria's last wilderness

Wildlife secrets of Nigeria's last wilderness

Science
The world's rarest chimpanzee has been captured on camera in the remote forests of Nigeria.The Nigeria-Cameroon chimp was seen at various locations within Gashaka Gumti National Park, raising hopes for its future survival.Conservationists also recorded the first sighting in the country of a giant pangolin.The park is regarded as a national treasure, but its wildlife is under threat from pressures such as poaching.Researchers from Chester Zoo, working with the Nigeria National Park Service, surveyed over 1,000 square kilometres of the national park.Known for its mountain rainforests, savannah woodlands and rolling grasslands, it is home to some of West Africa's most endangered animals.The cameras spotted some animals that have never been recorded before in the area and others, like chimps, ...
Wildlife colonises man-made rockpools

Wildlife colonises man-made rockpools

Science
Mini rock pools are being created by scientists trying to protect sea life from the boom in manmade sea defences.Aberystwyth University researchers have drilled holes the size of a family baked bean can into a breakwater made of smooth granite blocks.The blocks had attracted few intertidal creatures. But the new holes were swiftly colonised by fish, anemones and important reef-building honeycomb worms. The scientists hope that the thousands of miles of manmade sea walls under construction to hold back sea levels will incorporate wildlife-friendly features like this.They have also designed an experimental form of concrete, dubbed Reefcrete. The hope is that this material will attract creatures to colonise sea walls.Conventional sea walls are often inhospitable for sea life because they are ...