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Tag: Wildlife

WWF report: Mass wildlife loss caused by human consumption

WWF report: Mass wildlife loss caused by human consumption

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device "Exploding human consumption" has caused a massive drop in global wildlife populations in recent decades, the WWF conservation group says.In a report, the charity says losses in vertebrate species - mammals, fish, birds, amphibians and reptiles - averaged 60% between 1970 and 2014."Earth is losing biodiversity at a rate seen only during mass extinctions," the WWF's Living Planet Report adds.It urges policy makers to set new targets for sustainable development.The Living Planet Report, published every two years, aims to assess the state of the world's wildlife.The 2018 edition says only a quarter of the world's land area is now free from the impact of human activity and the proportion will have falle...
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Gazing monkeys image wins

Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Gazing monkeys image wins

Science
Two snub-nosed monkeys are pictured resting on a stone and staring intently into the distance. What are they looking at, and what are they thinking? It turns out they are watching a big barney between members of their troop. This image of apparent serenity versus commotion is the overall winner of the 2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, announced at a gala dinner at London's Natural History Museum. The picture was taken by Marsel van Oosten in China's Qinling Mountains. The Dutchman had to follow the troop for many days to understand the animals' dynamics and predict their behaviour. His goal was to show in one shot the beautiful hair on a male snub-nosed monkey's back, and the creature's blue face. Marsel's perseverance eventually paid of...
What the fire near Saddleworth Moor means for wildlife

What the fire near Saddleworth Moor means for wildlife

Science
The fire near Saddleworth Moor now spans over seven square miles, and local residents have been evacuated from some of the worst affected areas.But what does it mean for the wildlife that rely on the moor?"It couldn't have happened at a worse time," says David Hunt, an Upland Conservation Officer with the RSPB."This time of year we're in the middle of the bird breeding season. So ground nesting birds will inevitably have been affected."You could potentially still have birds on eggs. Although it's starting to get quite late; some smaller birds might be on second clutches," he told BBC News. The RSPB's Dove Stone site is home to an internationally important population of w...
Wildlife photo competition disqualifies 'stuffed anteater' image

Wildlife photo competition disqualifies 'stuffed anteater' image

Science
A winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition has been disqualified for featuring a taxidermy specimen. The image, known as The Night Raider, shows an anteater moving towards a termite mound in a Brazilian reserve. London's Natural History Museum, which runs the competition, says the use of stuffed animals breaches its rules. The photographer, Marcio Cabral, denies he faked the scene, and claims there is a witness who was with him on the day.Other photographers and tourists were in the park at the same time and therefore "it would be very unlikely anyone wouldn't see a stuffed animal being transported and placed carefully in this position", he told BBC News.But Roz Kidman Cox, the chair of judges for Wildlife Photographer of the Year (WPY), was stern in her criticism...
Feed the birds, but be aware of risks, say wildlife experts

Feed the birds, but be aware of risks, say wildlife experts

Science
Scientists are warning of the risks of wild birds spreading diseases when they gather at feeders in gardens.Experts led by Zoological Society of London say people should continue to feed birds, especially in winter, but should be aware of the risks.If birds look sick, food should be withdrawn temporarily, they say.The review of 25 years' worth of data identified emerging threats to garden birds. Finches, doves and pigeons are vulnerable to a parasite infection. Meanwhile, a form of bird pox is becoming more common, causing warty-like lumps on the bodies of great tits and other birds.Other disease threats, such as salmonella, appear to be declining."Our study shows how three of the most common diseases that affect British garden birds have changed both dramatically and unpredictably over th...