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Hidden camera’s hugging tiger wins wildlife photo award

Hidden camera’s hugging tiger wins wildlife photo award

Science
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Wildlife Photographer Of The Year revealed – take a look at the best images of 2020

Wildlife Photographer Of The Year revealed – take a look at the best images of 2020

Entertainment
This incredible image of a Siberian tiger, a species which has previously been "hunted to the verge of extinction", has won the Wildlife Photographer Of The Year award for 2020.Selected from more than 49,000 entries from around the world, Sergey Gorshkov's photograph was praised as a "scene like no other" by judges of the annual Natural History Museum competition. Titled The Embrace, it shows an Amur, or Siberian, tigress hugging an ancient Manchurian fir tree in the Russian Far East. It took the photographer 11 months to capture, using hidden cameras. Image: Liina Heikkinen's shot of a fox cub earned her the title of this year's Young Wildife Photographer Of The Year It was named the overall winner alongside 16 other category winners...
Coronavirus: Vietnam bans wildlife trade over pandemic risk

Coronavirus: Vietnam bans wildlife trade over pandemic risk

Science
Vietnam has banned the import of wildlife and wildlife products to reduce the risk of new pandemics. The move also bans wildlife markets for such items, including online sales. Vietnam has previously been accused of turning a blind eye to the sale of products such as pangolin scales and rhino horns often used in traditional medicine. Scientists have long warned that the wildlife trade can be an incubator for disease.The origins of the current Covid-19 pandemic are thought to lie in the wildlife trade, with the disease emerging in bats and jumping to people via another, as yet unidentified, species, which could include rats, civets and pangolins."The prime minister orders the suspension of imports of wildlife - dead or alive - th...
Experts pitch surveillance system to detect viruses in wildlife before next pandemic

Experts pitch surveillance system to detect viruses in wildlife before next pandemic

Science
July 9 (UPI) -- Scientific experts said Thursday that a wildlife surveillance system must be developed before the next pandemic emerges. Evidence shows the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, came from bats that likely passed the virus onto another species before infecting humans, according to the World Health Organization. Advertisement Infectious disease experts, ecologists, wildlife biologists and other experts argue, in a paper published in the journal Science, that a decentralized global system of wildlife surveillance must be established before the next pandemic. "It's impossible to know how often animal viruses spill over into the human population, but coronaviruses alone have caused outbreaks in people three times in the last 20 years," co-author Jennifer Philips said in a pre...
Coronavirus lockdown wildlife recordings appeal

Coronavirus lockdown wildlife recordings appeal

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Scientists want people to send them their wildlife experiences under the coronavirus lockdown. They are keen to hear recordings of dawn choruses, animals in unusual places, and views of the night sky without pollution. The Earth Project is a global citizen science study co-ordinated by scientists across UK universities.It hopes to showcase how nature has capitalised on reduced human activity during the pandemic. The researchers want the public to help them capture a global representation of what we experienced on the ground during lockdown."We are hoping to create a useful shared library of baseline experiences for the public, reminding us in the future of what life and our relationship with nature ...