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Tag: wings

To attract mates, male fruit flies sing songs with their wings

To attract mates, male fruit flies sing songs with their wings

Science
Aug. 24 (UPI) -- Fruit flies are agile fliers. Evading the swat of a human hand is easy. But for males, wings aren't just a tool for travel and evasion. They're an instrument -- an instrument the would-be dads use to woo females. With the help of powerful microphones and neuron tracking technology, scientists at Aarhus University in Denmark identified the song motor circuit male fruit flies depend on for reproductive success. To most, the tiny fruit fly is nothing more than a nuisance. But for researchers, especially neuroscientists, the fruit fly is the perfect model. Scientists have used the fruit fly and its 200,000 brain neurons to gain insight into the mysteries of genetics, neural development, disease and more. A combination of advanced acoustic and imaging technologies allowed scie...
Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Science
Aug. 3 (UPI) -- To keep bee hives cool, honey bees fan their wings to promote circulation. New research suggests the behavior is socially influenced. Previous research showed groups of bees are more likely to fan their wings. The newest study revealed the individual interactions that promote group behavior. Observations showed older, more experienced worker bees encourage younger nurse bees to fan their wings. Scientists found older bees had the greatest influence on younger bees when they were the first to fan in a group. "The older workers are definitely influencing the younger nurse bees," researcher Rachael Kaspar said in a news release. "I was interested in how different age groups socially interacted, what are the variances between age groups and how are they interacting to have a p...
Earwig wings inspire scientists working on foldable device designs

Earwig wings inspire scientists working on foldable device designs

Science
March 22 (UPI) -- When most people think of origami, they think of a swan or a butterfly. When a group of scientists in Switzerland think of origami, they think of an earwig.Researchers at ETH Zurich say the wing of an earwig is the perfect example of origami's design principles.When folded, the earwig's wing fits snuggly and compactly against its body, allowing it to tunnel into the soil. When it emerges from dirt, the wing expands, increasing its surface area by a factor of ten and allowing the insect to take flight.What's more, the wing is so structurally sound that it doesn't require muscle activation for stability. It also folds into itself with a simple click -- a model of efficiency.To better understand the wing's genius, scientists at ETH Zurich set out to recreate it. While tradit...
Bruins not expected to have Rask against visiting Red Wings

Bruins not expected to have Rask against visiting Red Wings

Sports
Tuukka Rask has been in goal for all three Boston Bruins victories over the Detroit Red Wings this season, allowing five goals in the three games. But Rask, apparently, will not be in net when the Bruins close the season series on Tuesday night at TD Garden. Rask, who missed Saturday night's 2-1 win over the Montreal Canadiens with what he called "a very minor injury," was not on the ice for practice Monday and will likely watch Anton Khudobin play Tuesday night. "Tuukka is nursing a minor injury and he stayed off today," Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said Monday. "We'll keep an eye out on that one. Other than not having skated now for three days, it doesn't look like he'll be able to go tomorrow, but that's just an observation. "He probably wants to get a little bit of work before he goes ba...
The other Dodo: Extinct bird that used its wings as clubs

The other Dodo: Extinct bird that used its wings as clubs

Science
The extinct Dodo had a little-known relative on another island. This fascinating bird ultimately suffered the same fate as its iconic cousin, but we can reconstruct some of its biology thanks to the writings of a French explorer who studied it during his travels of the Indian Ocean.In the middle of the 18th century, at around the time the US was signing the declaration of independence, a large flightless bird quietly became extinct on an island in the Indian Ocean. Today this bird is all but forgotten. Early explorers to the tiny island of Rodrigues in the Indian Ocean described a "Dodo" living on the forested island. Males were grey-brown, and females sandy, both having strong legs and a long, proud necks... but despite outward similarities to the iconic Mauritian bird, this wasn't in fac...