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Tag: women

CDC: Number of women with opioid use disorder quadruples in 15 years

CDC: Number of women with opioid use disorder quadruples in 15 years

Health
Aug. 9 (UPI) -- Pregnant women with opioid overuse have quadrupled over 15 years, according to an analysis of hospital deliveries by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday. The findings revealed significant increases in 28 states with available data for pregnant women with a pattern of opioid use, the agency reports. The CDC says opioid overuse during pregnancy has been linked to negative health outcomes for mothers and their babies, including maternal death, preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal abstinence syndrome. "These findings illustrate the devastating impact of the opioid epidemic on families across the U.S., including on the very youngest," Dr. Robert R. Redfield, the CDC director, said in a press release. "Untreated opioid use disorder during pregnancy...
Experts warn women of social egg freezing risks

Experts warn women of social egg freezing risks

Technology
Women who freeze their eggs to extend their fertility run the risk of spending a lot of money for a treatment with a small chance of success. So-called social egg freezing (SEF) can be used to put off childbearing or because a woman has not yet found a partner.But the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCog) has warned that egg freezing does not guarantee future live births and there are storage limits for how long eggs can be kept frozen, currently 10 years in the UK.Egg freezing is not available on the NHS apart from in certain circumstances, for example a woman undergoing medical treatment that may affect fertility.Rcog said the best time to freeze eggs was in a woman's early 20s, before the quality of the eggs and depleted, and "certainly" before the age...
Japan medical school confirms altering scores to limit women

Japan medical school confirms altering scores to limit women

Health
A Tokyo medical school apologized Tuesday after an internal investigation confirmed that it altered entrance exam scores for years to limit the number of female students and ensure more men became doctors. Tokyo Medical University manipulated all entrance exam results starting in 2006 or even earlier, according to findings released by lawyers involved in the investigation, confirming recent reports in Japanese media. The school said the manipulation should not have occurred and would not in the future. It said it would consider retroactively admitting those who otherwise would have passed the exams, although it did not explain how it would do so. The initial media reports on the scandal said the manipulation removed as much as 10 percent of female applicants in some years. The manipulati...
Tokyo Medical University changed scores to limit admittance of women

Tokyo Medical University changed scores to limit admittance of women

World
Aug. 7 (UPI) -- A medical school in Japan admitted Tuesday it altered the results of entrance exams to limit the number of women admitted to the university. Officials at the Tokyo Medical University offered an apology after an internal investigation revealed the manipulated results starting in 2006. The probe found that the school subtracted points for female applicants while padding the scores for men. School officials did so out of the belief that women would discontinue their medical careers or take long periods of absence if they got married or had children, Kyodo News reported. The practice was "nothing but discrimination against women," one of the lawyers involved in the investigation said. The probe found that former Chairman Masahiko Usui and former President Mamoru Suzuki each a...
Why are women only saving half as much as men for retirement?

Why are women only saving half as much as men for retirement?

Finance
Planning young: a retirement roadmap All working Americans need retirement savings, regardless of gender. But the need is particularly strong for women, since they have a tendency to live longer than their male counterparts. They're also more likely to require paid care at some point — as a spouse may not be around to provide care. It's therefore unsettling to learn that women are only saving about half as much as men for the future. In a recent Student Loan Hero study, women had an average of $ 45,614 socked away for retirement, whereas men had $ 90,189. That sort of gap could put women at a severe disadvantage later in life. Why are women falling behind savings-wise? When asked why they're struggling to save for retirement, women cited living paycheck to payc...