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Tag: work

Gen Dyn contracted for advance work on Columbia-class submarines

Gen Dyn contracted for advance work on Columbia-class submarines

Business
Sept. 14 (UPI) -- General Dynamics Electric Boat has received a $ 480.66 million contract for advance procurement and construction of the Columbia-class ballistic missile submarines. Work on the contract, announced Thursday by the Department of Defense, will be performed in Quonset, R.I., Newport News, Va., and Groton, Conn., and will be integrated into the lead ship construction in October 2020. The contract is being combined with a previous United Kingdom contract in the amount of $ 10 million. The Columbia-class is expected to replace the current fleet of Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines. It will field 16 Trident II D5 nuclear ballistic missiles, along with torpedoes for self-defense. Submarine Launched Ballistic Missiles, or SLBM, form a key part of the "nuclear triad" of U.S. ...
Trump eases US methane rules as Colorado says state's work

Trump eases US methane rules as Colorado says state's work

Technology
The Trump administration is rolling back some U.S. regulations on climate-changing methane pollution, calling them expensive and burdensome, but Colorado says its rules are working — and they have industry support. Energy companies have found and repaired about 73,000 methane leaks since 2015 under a state-required oil field inspection program, according to the Colorado Air Pollution Control Division. The number of leaks fell by 52 percent, from more than 36,000 in 2015 to about 17,250 in 2017, according a state report released last week. Neither the government nor industry groups could say how much methane has been kept out of the atmosphere when the leaks were fixed, citing the complexity of factors involved. But state officials said the sharp decline in the number of leaks shows...
Struck-off Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba wins appeal to work again

Struck-off Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba wins appeal to work again

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device A doctor who was struck off over the death of a six-year-old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence in 2015 over the death of Jack Adcock, who died of sepsis at Leicester Royal Infirmary in 2011. She was struck off in January 2018. Speaking after the appeal, the doctor said she was "pleased with the outcome" but wanted to "pay tribute and remember Jack Adcock, a wonderful little boy".Jack's mother, Nicola Adcock, said she was "disgusted" and "devastated" by the judgement and that it made a "mockery of the justice system".'Sorry'Dr Bawa-Garba told BBC's Panorama: "I want to let the parents know that I'm sorry for my ro...
When work puts you back in the closet

When work puts you back in the closet

Finance
How GLAAD got Twitter to uncensor 'queer' Jennifer came out as bisexual when she was in high school. But after an interview for her first professional job out of college, she decided she wouldn't share her queer identity at work. She grew out her undercut, removed her nose ring and hid anything else she thought might make coworkers whisper. On her first day, she noticed the conservative dress at her company, and later on, her supervisor even made a point to bring up Jennifer's clothing choices in their performance evaluations. She noticed men around the office making jokes about an LGBTQ dating app or awkwardly talking about gay family members. "It's not like I'm trying to meet people at work, but there was a period of about a year where I was single and dating women, ...
Expectation to check work email after hours is hurting our health and relationships

Expectation to check work email after hours is hurting our health and relationships

Health
Being expected to check work email during non-work hours is making employees, as well as their significant others, experience higher levels of anxiety, a study shows. Researchers from Virginia Tech surveyed 108 employees working at least 30 hours per week, 138 significant others and 105 managers and found that the sheer expectation of monitoring work email, rather than the amount of time spent doing so, led to increased anxiety in both employees and their significant others. "Some employees admitted to monitoring their work email from every hour to every few minutes, which resulted in higher levels of anxiety and conflict between spouses," co-author William Becker, an associate professor of management in the Pamplin College of Business, told ABC News. Significant others also reported d...