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Tag: workers

Workers urge Amazon boss to restore share schemes

Workers urge Amazon boss to restore share schemes

Technology
Dozens of UK Amazon warehouse workers have sent emails directly to Jeff Bezos urging him to restore their employee share and incentive schemes, which they say have been cut in order to fund a promised pay rise. Sky News has seen some of the emails, which mainly come from longer-term workers, who say they have been hit hard by the changes.In one, a worker at a fulfilment centre in Dunfermline warns Mr Bezos that the move "may receive major backlash and some disappointed workers".The email continues: "We take great pleasure in receiving our shares as that is what makes Amazon unique and for people that have children it is a delight to have that extra bonus."In another, a worker who says they have worked for seven years in Amazon's fulfilment centre at Doncaster, tells Mr Bezo...
Global warming increases risk of heat stress for outdoor workers

Global warming increases risk of heat stress for outdoor workers

Science
Oct. 8 (UPI) -- Every year, a few hundred people in the United States die as a result of heat exposure, making heat stress the leading cause of weather-related deaths -- deadlier than lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes and floods. Outdoor workers are especially vulnerable to heat, and their risk of exposure to heat stress conditions is likely to increase as the effects of climate change progress. That's why several advocacy groups, including Public Citizen and the United Farm Workers, have petitioned the federal government to establish stronger -- and specific -- heat stress-related protections for outdoor workers. Heat stress conditions are produced by the combination of high temperatures and high humidity. When it's humid, sweat can't evaporate efficiently, limiting the body's natural abi...
'We are totally happy,' says paid Amazon workers on Twitter

'We are totally happy,' says paid Amazon workers on Twitter

Technology
Amazon is taking an out-of-the box approach to answering its critics — paying workers to be "ambassadors" and tweet full-time about how satisfied they were at their jobs. One worker who Amazon says used to pack boxes at its warehouse in Jacksonville, Florida, tweeted about air circulation at the online retailer's warehouse being "very good." Plus, the worker whose account gives her name as Shauntrelle, says workers there get two 30-minute breaks during their 10-hour shifts, something she calls "a benefit." Others on social media were skeptical of her cheery messages, calling her a bot. Shauntrelle responded to them, too, even with a misspelling: "We are totally noraml and not bots and we are totally happy working for an amazing company." The tweets are part of Amazon's plan to figh...
The stress that kills American workers

The stress that kills American workers

Finance
WORK can make you sick and shorten your life. That is the argument of a hard-hitting book* by Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. In an obvious way, that claim is outdated. Health-and-safety rules help explain why deaths from accidents in American workplaces fell by 65% between 1970 and 2015. But one problem has not gone away: stress. As many as 80% of American workers suffer from high levels of stress in their job, according to a survey entitled “Attitudes in the American Workplace”. Nearly half say it is so debilitating that they need help.Firms are at least aware of the issue. A study in 2008 by Watson Wyatt (a consultancy that is now part of Towers Watson) found that 48% of organisations said job-related stress affected performance. But...
Workers of Hawaii agency that sent false alert seen sleeping

Workers of Hawaii agency that sent false alert seen sleeping

Technology
An employee of the Hawaii agency that mistakenly sent cellphone and broadcast alerts about an imminent missile attack earlier this year said he saw staff members watching movies or TV on the job. The worker wrote an email to the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency's administrator saying another staffer witnessed all three people on duty asleep. The email was dated Jan. 14, the day after the alert went out. The employee's name wasn't released. A different agency worker mistakenly sent the warning that a ballistic missile was heading to the islands, leading hundreds of thousands of people to believe they were about to die in a nuclear attack. The button pusher thought it was a real emergency even though other workers understood it was an exercise. The agency later fired him. It took the age...