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Supermodel Winnie Harlow strips to tiny thong to rock world's sexiest wedgie

Supermodel Winnie Harlow strips to tiny thong to rock world's sexiest wedgie

Entertainment
The Canadian starlet is known for embracing her skin pigment condition Vitiligo.Now, Winnie has taken to Instagram to show off her killer curves in a stunning nearly naked snap.Wearing nothing but a teeny tiny thong, the raven-haired beauty impressed fans as she flashed her pert peach in a raunchy photo.With her back facing the mirror, Winnie faced the other direction and proudly showcased her sensational frame, writing: "The real difference isn't my skin.INSTAGRAMSUPERMODEL: Winnie Harlow stripped off for her latest sexy snapSexiest thong snaps REVEALED Celebs Sexiest thong snaps REVEALLED on social media.Instagram That thong th thong thong thong INSTAGRAMSULTRY SNAPS: Winnie's Instagram is flooded with stunning pics"It's the fact that I don't find my beauty in
Secrets of the world's toughest creatures revealed

Secrets of the world's toughest creatures revealed

Science
Genetic analyses of tardigrades has revealed some of the secrets of their incredible survival abilities.These tiny creatures, sometimes called water bears, can survive radiation, freezing, extreme dehydration and even the vacuum of space.Researchers have now decoded the DNA of two species of tardigrade and uncovered the genes that allow them to be revived after desiccation.The study has been published in the journal, PLOS Biology.Just a millimetre or less in size, tardigrades are believed to be the toughest creatures on Earth. A recent study found that they could survive almost any cosmic disaster that could hit the planet. Tardigrades are often found in locations that dry out such as in moss and in ponds. Over time they have acquired the ability to survive extreme dehydration and spring b...
World's first floating wind farm emerges off coast of Scotland

World's first floating wind farm emerges off coast of Scotland

Technology
The world's first full-scale floating wind farm has started to take shape off the north-east coast of Scotland.The revolutionary technology will allow wind power to be harvested in waters too deep for the current conventional bottom-standing turbines used.The Peterhead wind farm, known as Hywind, is a trial which will bring power to 20,000 homes. Manufacturer Statoil says output from the turbines is expected to equal or surpass generation from current ones.It hopes to cash in on a boom in the technology, especially in Japan and the West coast of the US, where waters are deep."This is a tech development project to ensure it's working in open sea conditions. It's a game-changer for floating wind power and we are sure it will help bring costs down," said Leif Delp, project director for Hywind...
World's large carnivores being pushed off the map

World's large carnivores being pushed off the map

Science
Six of the world's large carnivores have lost more than 90% of their historic range, according to a study.The Ethiopian wolf, red wolf, tiger, lion, African wild dog and cheetah have all been squeezed out as land is lost to human settlements and farming.Reintroduction of carnivores into areas where they once roamed is vital in conservation, say scientists.This relies on human willingness to share the landscape with the likes of the wolf.The research, published in Royal Society Open Science, was carried out by Christopher Wolf and William Ripple of Oregon State University.They mapped the current range of 25 large carnivores using International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List data. This was compared with historic maps from 500 years ago. The work shows that large carnivore r...
Do you live in the world's laziest country?

Do you live in the world's laziest country?

Health
US scientists have amassed "planetary-scale" data from people's smartphones to see how active we really are. The Stanford University analysis of 68 million days' worth of minute-by-minute data showed the average number of daily steps was 4,961.Hong Kong was top averaging 6,880 a day, while Indonesia was bottom of the rankings with just 3,513.But the findings also uncovered intriguing details that could help tackle obesity.Most smartphones have a built-in accelerometer that can record steps and the researchers used anonymous data from more than 700,000 people who used the Argus activity monitoring app.Scott Delp, a professor of bioengineering and one of the researchers, said: "The study is 1,000 times larger than any previous study on human movement."There have been wonderful health surveys...