News That Matters

Tag: ‘World’s

World’s deepest octopus captured on camera

World’s deepest octopus captured on camera

Science
The deepest ever sighting of an octopus has been made by cameras on the Indian Ocean floor. The animal was spotted 7,000m down in the Java Trench - almost 2km deeper than the previous reliable recording. Researchers, who report the discovery in the journal Marine Biology, say it's a species of "Dumbo" octopus.The name is a nod to the prominent ear-like fins just above these animals' eyes that make them look like the 1940s Disney cartoon character.The scientist behind the identification is Dr Alan Jamieson.He's pioneered the exploration of the deep using what are called "landers".These are instrumented frames dropped overboard from research ships. They settle on the seabed and record what passes by. ...
We Are One: How the world’s film festivals came together

We Are One: How the world’s film festivals came together

Entertainment
A foreign language film about the social divide in South Korea wouldn't normally scream box office hit. But after Bong Joon-ho's film Parasite won the top prize at the Cannes Film Festival last May, it set it on a path to ultimately winning the best picture Oscar nine months later. And that's the thing about film festivals - they may be industry events largely attended by critics, journalists and filmmakers, but their influence can be huge. The buzz a movie generates at Sundance, Toronto or Venice can determine whether a distributor picks it up for a wider public release - and put it firmly on the radar of awards season.Of course, the coronavirus pandemic has meant most of this year's festivals cannot go ahead - so they are teami...
Naomi Osaka: Japanese tennis star becomes world’s highest-paid female athlete

Naomi Osaka: Japanese tennis star becomes world’s highest-paid female athlete

Sports
Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka has become the world's highest-paid female athlete, displacing US rival Serena Williams at the top of the list.According to Forbes magazine, Osaka, 22, a two-time Grand Slam champion, made £30.7m in prize money and endorsements over the past 12 months.That was £1.15m more than the amount earned by 38-year-old Williams. Both shattered the previous single-year earnings record of £24.4m set in 2015 by Russia's Maria Sharapova.Since Forbes began tracking women athletes' income in 1990, tennis players have topped the annual list every year.Osaka, whose father was born in Haiti and whose mother is Japanese, is 29th on the 2020 Forbes list of the world's 100 top-pai
World’s longest predatory dinosaur used its tail to swim

World’s longest predatory dinosaur used its tail to swim

Science
April 29 (UPI) -- Paleontologists finally have proof that some dinosaurs were aquatic. Detailed analysis of the only existing Spinosaurus aegyptiacus remains suggests the world's longest predatory dinosaur lived in a large river system and used its tail to swim. The discovery -- published this week in the journal Nature -- marks the first time a tail-propelled swimming locomotion has been reported in a dinosaur. "This discovery really opens our eyes to this whole new world of possibilities for dinosaurs," lead study author Nizar Ibrahim, professor at the University of Detroit Mercy, said in a news release. "It doesn't just add to an existing narrative, it starts a whole new narrative and drastically changes things in terms of what we know dinosaurs could actually do. There's nothing like...
Europe’s Cheops telescope begins study of far-off worlds

Europe’s Cheops telescope begins study of far-off worlds

Science
Europe's newest space telescope has begun ramping up its science operations.Cheops was launched in December to study and characterise planets outside our Solar System.And after a period of commissioning and testing, the orbiting observatory is now ready to fulfil its mission.Early targets for investigation include the so-called "Styrofoam world" Kelt-11b; the "lava planet" 55 Cancri-e; and the "evaporating planet" GJ-436b.Discovered in previous surveys of the sky, Cheops hopes to add to the knowledge of what these and hundreds of other far-flung objects are really like. The Swiss-led telescope will do this by watching for the tiny changes in light when a world passes in ...