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Tag: worm

New quantum thermometer can measure a fever in a tiny worm

New quantum thermometer can measure a fever in a tiny worm

Science
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- Scientists have successfully outfitted an optical microscope with quantum sensors, creating a precise microscope-based thermometer, capable of sensing a "fever" in tiny nematode worms. Quantum systems are extremely sensitive to their surrounding environs, making them ideal for measuring in vivo temperature changes. Optical microscopes allow scientists to image microscopic structures in biological samples, and when combined with fluorescent biomarkers, can be used to observe biological processes. Advertisement In a new proof-of-concept study, researchers at Osaka City University combined the two technologies in order to observe biological systems and processes in which heat and temperature play an important role. "Our system effectively integrates fast particle tracking a...
Scientists name four new Elvis worm species

Scientists name four new Elvis worm species

Science
May 15 (UPI) -- The group of deep sea worms known as Elvis worms is comprised of at least four distinct species, according to a new study. The new species were collected by scientists over the course of several years. The four species are technically scale worms, but researchers began referring to them as Elvis worms -- a reference to their unique appearance. The deep sea scale worms sport iridescent plate-covered shells that recall the King's sequined jumpsuits. Scientists were only recently able to distinguish between different Elvis worm species by using genetic analysis. Researchers described the four species -- Peinaleopolynoe goffrediae, P. mineoi, P. orphanage and P. elvisi -- in a new paper published this week in the journal ZooKeys. Beneath their glittering scales are lung-like ...
Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings

Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings

Science
A worm-like creature that burrowed on the seafloor more than 500 million years ago may be key to the evolution of much of the animal kingdom. The organism, about the size of a grain of rice, is described as the earliest example yet found in the fossil record of a bilaterian.These are animals that have a front and back, two symmetrical sides, and openings at either end joined by a gut.The discovery is described in the journal PNAS.The scientists behind it say the development of bilateral symmetry was a critical step in the evolution of animal life.It gave organisms the ability to move purposefully and a common, yet successful way to organise their bodies. A multitude of animals, from worms to ins...
550-million-year-old worm tracks offer earliest evidence of animal mobility

550-million-year-old worm tracks offer earliest evidence of animal mobility

Science
Sept. 4 (UPI) -- Newly unearthed worm tracks have provided the earliest evidence of animal mobility. The worm fossil also offered the earliest evidence of a segmented, bilaterally symmetric body plan. Using a molecular clock, scientists previously predicted that segmented, mobile, bilaterally symmetric species first emerged during the Ediacaran Period. Indentations in 550-million-year-old rocks in China confirmed the prediction. The ancient fossil is unique in that it not only provided proof of animal mobility, but also revealed the identity of the animal that left the tracks. Scientists described their discovery this week in the journal Nature. "Mobility made it possible for animals to make an unmistakable footprint on Earth, both literally and metaphorically," Shuhai Xiao, a professor ...
Different genes control lifespan, healthspan, according to new worm study

Different genes control lifespan, healthspan, according to new worm study

Science
July 17 (UPI) -- Most people don't just want to live a long time, they want to age well. They want to stay healthier for longer. The quality of a person's life as they age is called healthspan, and new research suggests different genes control lifespan and healthspan. While tracking the healthspan of an aging population, including factors like mobility and immune resistance, is difficult, researchers suggest interventions designed to improve healthspan could prove more effective. For the study, scientists analyzed a protein called TCER-1 in the worm species Caenorhabditis elegans. Previous studies have linked TCER-1 expression with enhanced longevity in the transparent nematodes. Earlier tests also showed the protein is essential to the worm's fertility. For the newest experiments, scien...