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Tag: years

'100,000 orangutans' killed in 16 years

'100,000 orangutans' killed in 16 years

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceMore than 100,000 Critically Endangered orangutans have been killed in Borneo since 1999, research has revealed. Scientists who carried out a 16-year survey on the island described the figure as "mind-boggling". Deforestation, driven by logging, oil palm, mining and paper mills, continues to be the main culprit.But the research, published in the journal Current Biology, also revealed that animals were "disappearing" from areas that remained forested. This implied large numbers of orangutans were simply being slaughtered, said lead researcher Maria Voigt of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany. Read also: Saving the orangutans of SumatraDr Voigt and her colleagues say the animals are being targeted by hunters and are b...
European Union grows at fastest pace for 10 years

European Union grows at fastest pace for 10 years

Business
The European Union economy grew at its fastest pace in a decade last year, figures from the EU statistics office Eurostat have confirmed.The 28-strong EU expanded by 2.5% in 2017, its strongest performance since 2007, when it grew by 2.7%.In the final three months both the EU and the 19-nation eurozone grew by 0.6% compared with the previous quarter.That was mirrored by growth in the EU's biggest economy, Germany, which grew by 0.6% in the final quarter of 2017.France also expanded by 0.6%, while Spanish growth was a notch stronger at 0.7%.Overall in 2017, the eurozone grew by 2.5%, Eurostat said, the fastest growth rate since a 3% rise in 2007.These latest figures confirm the flash estimates published by Eurostat at the end of January, which were based on more limited data. Investec eco...
Teacher on life support as worst flu outbreak in years engulfs US

Teacher on life support as worst flu outbreak in years engulfs US

Health
A special education teacher in Texas is reportedly on life support after contracting both strains of influenza, as the worst flu season in years engulfs the United States. Crystal Whitley, who teaches in Mullin, got the flu shot in October after giving birth to her son, family members told ABC affiliate WFAA. But she caught both the H3N2 and H1N1 flu strains two weeks ago. Then she came down with pneumonia in both lungs and contracted MRSA, a bacterial infection that's become resistant to many of the antibiotics. Now, Whitley is on life support at Baylor University Medical Center, according to WFAA. "She's making all of this progress, but [doctors] keep telling us she is still very ill. She is still critical, and she is still on life support," Whitley's mother, Mary O’Connor, told WFA
The last decade was hotter than the previous 11,000 years, study shows

The last decade was hotter than the previous 11,000 years, study shows

Science
Jan. 31 (UPI) -- A new survey of temperature variability in North America and Europe during the Holocene Epoch suggests the string of record-setting temperatures over the last decade is truly an exception. During the last 11,000 years, it's never been this hot for this many years in a row."I would say it is significant that temperatures of the most recent decade exceed the warmest temperatures of our reconstruction by 0.5 degrees Fahrenheit, having few -- if any -- precedents over the last 11,000 years," Jeremiah Marsicek, who recently earned his doctoral graduate in geology and geophysics at the University of Wyoming, said in a news release. "Additionally, we learned that the climate fluctuates naturally over the last 11,000 years and would have led to cooling today in the absence of huma...
Fossil found in Israel suggests Homo sapiens left Africa 180,000 years ago

Fossil found in Israel suggests Homo sapiens left Africa 180,000 years ago

Science
Jan. 25 (UPI) -- Scientists believe an ancient human jawbone found in Israel belonged to a Homo sapien. The fossil, dated between 177,000 and 194,000 years old, suggests humans left Africa 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.Last year, scientists found a 300,000-year-old Homo sapien fossil in Morocco. Previously, scientists thought Homo sapiens first emerged 200,000 years ago in East Africa.Until recently, scientists thought modern humans left Africa in a mass exodus around 60,000 years ago, spreading out across Eurasia. Over the last decade, scientists have uncovered evidence that suggests the mass exodus was preceded by earlier, smaller migrations out of Africa, some as far back as 120,000 years ago.The latest discovery -- detailed this week in the journal Science Advances -- pu...