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Tag: younger

Offline retailers use technology to attract younger consumers

Offline retailers use technology to attract younger consumers

Finance
BENGALURU: Brick-and-mortar retailers such as Lifestyle International, Shoppers Stop and Arvind Fashions are tweaking their merchandise mix or using technology to attract younger consumers who shop online. “The footfall of 18-22 year olds shrank by about 4% last year,” said Vasanth Kumar, managing director of Lifestyle International, adding that tablets to browse collections, a digital fitting-room assistant to alert the staff for product sizes and smart self-checkout services have been installed at key locations. “Making the time-starved and tech-savvy segment come to the store is our focus this year. The tech initiatives have been made keeping millennials in mind to reduce their pain points.” India has a median population age of 27.3 years compared with 35 years f...
Breast cancer: Scan younger women at risk, charity says

Breast cancer: Scan younger women at risk, charity says

Health
Younger women with a family history of breast cancer should receive annual screenings to pick up the disease earlier, a charity says.Breast Cancer Now funded a study which found cancers were detected sooner when 35 to 39-year-olds at risk had annual mammograms.NHS screening often starts at the age of 40 for women with a family history.Experts need to balance the benefits of doing more checks against causing any undue worry or over-treatment. The study's authors said that more analysis was needed on the risks, costs and benefits of extending the screening programme.But Baroness Delyth Morgan, the charity's chief executive, called for the government's forthcoming review of NHS screening programmes in England to consider the introduction of scans for women a...
Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Science
Aug. 3 (UPI) -- To keep bee hives cool, honey bees fan their wings to promote circulation. New research suggests the behavior is socially influenced. Previous research showed groups of bees are more likely to fan their wings. The newest study revealed the individual interactions that promote group behavior. Observations showed older, more experienced worker bees encourage younger nurse bees to fan their wings. Scientists found older bees had the greatest influence on younger bees when they were the first to fan in a group. "The older workers are definitely influencing the younger nurse bees," researcher Rachael Kaspar said in a news release. "I was interested in how different age groups socially interacted, what are the variances between age groups and how are they interacting to have a p...