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Tag: Zika

Asian tiger mosquito presents limited risk for Zika virus outbreaks

Asian tiger mosquito presents limited risk for Zika virus outbreaks

Science
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- The Asian tiger mosquito poses only a minor risk for Zika virus, according to new epidemiological simulations. The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary vector for Zika virus, the infectious disease that can spread from mother to fetus, causing congenital deformities. Advertisement However, lab experiments have previously shown the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus can carry and transmit the disease. In 2019, scientists in France blamed several instances of Zika infection and transmission on the Asian tiger mosquito, an aggressive biter that originates from Southeast Asia but has colonized much of temperate Europe. Thanks to its ability to survive harsh winters, the Asian tiger mosquito is now found all over the world. The species is the second-most comm...
First human trial of live, weakened Zika vaccine underway

First human trial of live, weakened Zika vaccine underway

Health
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- The first clinical trial of a live, weakened Zika vaccine in humans has begun, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases announced on Thursday. The vaccine for Zika, a disease mainly spread by mosquitoes, was developed by scientists at the NIAID, the agency announced. NIAIA is sponsoring the trial among 28 healthy, non-pregnant adults ages 18 to 50 at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Immunization Research in Baltimore, Md., and at the Vaccine Testing Center at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont in Burlington. Twenty participants will receive the Zika vaccine and eight will get a placebo, according to ClinicalTrials.gov. No licensed vaccines for Zika virus infection are available, although several are ...
New drug thwarts Zika, dengue, West Nile in cell cultures

New drug thwarts Zika, dengue, West Nile in cell cultures

Health
Dec. 13 (UPI) -- Lab tests prove a new drug called NGI-1 is capable of shutting down flaviviruses, the family that includes mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, dengue and West Nile.The new drug works by cutting off access to key proteins in mammalian cells that invading viruses rely on. By robbing them of their energy sources, researchers say, the drug thwarts invasion.Remarkably, the technique lends NGI-1 potency against not one, but an entire family of viruses. Researchers detailed the drug's promise in a new paper published this week in the journal Cell Reports."Generally, when you develop a drug against a specific protein in dengue virus, for instance, it won't work for yellow fever or Zika, and you have to develop new antivirals for each," senior study author Jan Carette, an assistant p...