Thursday, January 26News That Matters
Shadow

Author: admin

‘Forever chemicals’ still in use in UK make-up

‘Forever chemicals’ still in use in UK make-up

Science
ReutersBy Esme StallardBBC News Climate and ScienceMajor beauty brands Urban Decay, Revolution and Inglot are selling make-up in the UK containing "forever chemicals", BBC News has found.These pollutants - known as PFAS - have been linked to serious health concerns including cancer.They are not illegal in the UK but five European countries are expected to propose an EU-wide ban on Friday.L'Oréal, which owns Urban Decay, told the BBC it was "well underway" with phasing out the chemicals.PFAS, which stands for poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances, are resistant to oil and water, making them highly valuable to the make-up industry. Historically they have been added to products to make them last longer, improve finish and preserve the colour of eyeshadows and lipsticks. Many brands are now "PFA...
The Senegal man on a mission to plant five million trees

The Senegal man on a mission to plant five million trees

Science
Jo Hollis/BBCBy Jo HollisBBC News, CasamanceA man in southern Senegal has set himself the ambitious task of planting five million trees over the next five years.This visionary project came to Adama Diémé when he returned home to the Casamance region in 2020 after a few years working in Europe.The 48-year-old was shocked that in villages that were populated with hundreds of gigantic trees in his youth, only a handful, if any, now remained."In some villages, you can't find one tree. They cut them but they don't think about planting again," he told the BBC.Across Africa desertification is one of the reasons blamed for deforestation but, in this area, along the sweeping expanse of the Casamance River, the trees are more likely to have been cut down for construction purposes like building house...
Met Office forecasts 2023 will be hotter than 2022

Met Office forecasts 2023 will be hotter than 2022

Science
Getty ImagesBy Georgina RannardBBC News Climate & ScienceNext year will be warmer than this one, and one of the hottest on record, the UK Met Office is forecasting.Predictions suggest it will be the 10th year in a row the global temperature is at least 1C above average.The Met Office explained that a cooling effect known as La Niña will likely end after being in place for three years - part of a natural weather cycle.It also noted the warming impact of human-induced climate change.Scientific evidence shows that climate change is driving up the global temperature.Governments globally have promised to cut emissions to keep temperature rise below 1.5C to avoid the worst effects of climate change.The world has already warmed by around 1.1C compared to the period before the Industrial Revol...
COP15: Nations reach ‘historic’ deal to protect nature

COP15: Nations reach ‘historic’ deal to protect nature

Science
BBC/H BriggsBy Helen BriggsEnvironment correspondent in MontrealA new deal to protect nature has been agreed at the UN biodiversity summit, COP 15.The "historic" plan will put 30% of the planet under protection by the end of the decade.There will also be targets for safeguarding vital ecosystems such as rainforests and wetlands.The agreement was finalised in the early hours of Monday in Montreal, Canada.The following points were agreed:Maintaining, enhancing and restoring ecosystems, including halting species extinction and maintaining genetic diversity of populations of wild animals."Sustainable use" of biodiversity - essentially ensuring that species and habitats can provide the services they provide for humanity, such as food and clean water, without being destroyed.Ensuring that the be...
SpaceX launches NASA’s water topography satellite into orbit

SpaceX launches NASA’s water topography satellite into orbit

Science
Dec. 16 (UPI) -- The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite launched Friday morning from the Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. The SpaceX 9 rocket lifted off at 6:47 a.m., launching the mission that will provide NASA's first global survey of water on Earth's surface, measuring the elevation of water in major lakes, rivers and wetlands while observing ocean features in higher definition than ever before. The data will help researchers better understand the availability of Earth's freshwater resources, track regional sea level changes and monitor coastal processes. "Once in orbit, SWOT will measure the height of water in freshwater bodies and the ocean on more than 90% of Earth's surface," NASA officials said in a statement. "This information will provide insights into how th...