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Space Perspective unveils luxurious interior of balloon-launched spaceflight experience

Space Perspective unveils luxurious interior of balloon-launched spaceflight experience

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., April 12 (UPI) -- Want to be a space tourist but can't spend tens of millions of dollars? Space Perspective, a Florida-based space tourism company, is working on another option that falls in the six-figure range. On Tuesday, the company provided a sneak peek into the luxurious $ 125,000-per-ride accommodations its passengers will enjoy as they stare down Earth from a vantage point that has mostly been limited to astronauts, the super rich and the super lucky. Coinciding with the anniversary of the first human spaceflight, the company released artist's illustrations of the interior of its crew capsule, called the Spaceship Neptune. The vessel is named for the Roman god of the sea and 8th planet in the solar system. Passengers who climb aboard will enjoy 360-degree panorami...
Rejuvenation of woman’s skin could tackle diseases of ageing

Rejuvenation of woman’s skin could tackle diseases of ageing

Science
Fátima SantosResearchers have rejuvenated a 53-year-old woman's skin cells so they are the equivalent of a 23-year-old's.The scientists in Cambridge believe that they can do the same thing with other tissues in the body.The eventual aim is to develop treatments for age-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and neurological disorders.The technology is built on the techniques used to create Dolly the cloned sheep more than 25 years ago.The head of the team, Prof Wolf Reik, of the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, told BBC News that he hoped that the technique could eventually be used to keep people healthier for longer as they grow older."We have been dreaming about this kind of thing. Many common diseases get worse with age and to think about helping people in this way is super ex...
Astronomers spot farthest galaxy ever, 13.5B light-years from Earth

Astronomers spot farthest galaxy ever, 13.5B light-years from Earth

Science
April 7 (UPI) -- A global team of astronomers has found the most distant space object ever, according to the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. It's a distant galaxy called HD1, some 13.5 billion light years away from Earth, with researchers offering two ideas of what, exactly, the galaxy is. The first paper, published this week in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters, is that HD1 could be creating stars at an astounding rate and could even be home to what's known as Population III stars. Population III stars are the universe's very first stars, which researchers say have never been seen until now. The second idea proposed by the team, in another paper published this week in the Astronomical Journal, is that HD1 could hold a supermassive black hole roug...
Biodiversity: Pressure grows for deal to save nature

Biodiversity: Pressure grows for deal to save nature

Science
Getty ImagesA global agreement to reverse the loss of nature and halt extinctions is inching closer, as talks in Geneva enter their final day.International negotiators are working on the text of a UN framework to safeguard nature ahead of a high-level summit in China later this year.Observers have slammed the "snail's pace" of negotiations and are pressing for a strengthening of ambitions.Divisions remain, including over financing the plans."The science is very clear, we do not have any more time to waste; we need to take action now," Bernadette Fischler Hooper, head of international advocacy at WWF-UK, told BBC News. "Not only on biodiversity loss, but also on climate change which is a very inter-linked issue. So that is what's at stake here; it's actually the future of the planet and its...
Astronauts plan spacewalk at ISS on Tuesday to prepare for new solar arrays

Astronauts plan spacewalk at ISS on Tuesday to prepare for new solar arrays

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., March 15 (UPI) -- Two NASA astronauts plan a spacewalk on Tuesday to prepare for the installation of new solar arrays at the International Space Station, amid tension between Russia and the United States over the Ukraine conflict. Astronauts Kayla Barron, 34, and Raja Chari, 44, plan to exit the station around 8 a.m. EDT for a roughly six-hour spacewalk -- their second and first spacewalks, respectively. They intend to install brackets and struts that will support the future installation of solar arrays. Two of six new solar arrays have been unfurled to power the station's electronics over the past year. NASA officials commented on the tensions over Russia's invasion of Ukraine during a press conference Monday. Joel Montalbano, NASA manager of the ISS program, directly addr...