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Archaeologists uncover dynamic human prehistory across the Arabian Peninsula

Archaeologists uncover dynamic human prehistory across the Arabian Peninsula

Science
Sept. 1 (UPI) -- Until now, relatively little was known about early human history on the Arabian Peninsula's vast interior. It turns out, the region was quite a dynamic place. An extensive archaeological survey of the peninsula's interior has turned up the earliest evidence that human habitation in the region dated to 400,000 years ago. The collaborative effort between researchers in Germany and Saudi Arabia -- detailed Wednesday in the journal Nature -- suggests humans moved across the peninsula in waves, each influx bringing a new phase of material culture to the interior. Both archaeological and paleoclimate data suggest the typically arid peninsula experienced periods of increased rainfall, making the region slightly more hospitable for humans moving through the region. I...
50,000 more businesses forced to close as Tier 4 widens across England

50,000 more businesses forced to close as Tier 4 widens across England

Business
More businesses face "insurmountable pressure" after a further 50,000 were forced to shut due to the extension of local lockdowns in England, it has been warned.Moving more areas into the toughest Tier 4 restrictions from Boxing Day to combat a fast-spreading mutant coronavirus strain will take the total number of non-essential shops, hairdressers and gyms closed across the country to around 220,000, data shows. The figures from real estate adviser Altus Group came as business and union leaders expressed concern at the widening crackdown and demanded increased support to prevent firms going bust and jobs being lost. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player ...
Virus levels falling across most of England, says ONS

Virus levels falling across most of England, says ONS

Health
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After wolves rebound across US West, future up to voters

Technology
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. -- The saucer-sized footprints in the mud around the bloody, disemboweled bison carcass were unmistakable: wolves.A pack of 35 named after a nearby promontory, Junction Butte, now were snoozing on a snow-dusted hillside above the carcass. Tourists dressed against the weather watched the pack through spotting scopes from about a mile away.“Wolves are my main thing. There’s something about their eyes -- it’s mystifying,” said Ann Moore, who came from Ohio to fulfill a life-long wish to glimpse the animals.Such encounters have become daily occurrences in Yellowstone after gray wolves rebounded in parts of the American West with remarkable speed following their reintroduction 25 years ago.It started with a few dozen wolves brought in crates from Canada to Yellow...
Rising atmospheric dust across the Great Plains recalls lead up to the Dust Bowl

Rising atmospheric dust across the Great Plains recalls lead up to the Dust Bowl

Science
Oct. 13 (UPI) -- Atmospheric dust levels are rising 5 percent per year across the Great Plains, according to a new survey by scientists at the University of Utah. The research, published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, increased cropland conversion and expanded growing seasons are exposing more and more soil and wind erosion. Advertisement Authors of the new study suggest the phenomenon, if combined with drier climate conditions as a result of climate change, could yield conditions comparable to the Dust Bowl, the series of droughts and dust storms that devastated the Midwest during the 1930s. "We can't make changes to the earth surface without some kind of consequence just as we can't burn fossil fuels without consequences," lead study author Andy Lambert said in a...