Monday, August 8News That Matters
Shadow

Tag: astronauts

Long-duration space flight equal to decade of bone loss in astronauts, study says

Long-duration space flight equal to decade of bone loss in astronauts, study says

Science
July 1 (UPI) -- Scientists have long known that astronauts lose bone density while in space, but a study published this week found they only partially recover this loss one year after returning to Earth. The researchers said the findings suggest long-duration spaceflight is equal to decades of bone loss in weight-bearing bones on Earth. The extent of the impact, though, varies depending upon the subject. Bone loss happens because bones don't have to carry your weight in microgravity, meaning astronauts use them less, leading to weakening. "Bone loss happens in humans -- as we age, get injured, or any scenario where we can't move the body, we lose bone," said Leigh Gabel, assistant professor in kinesiology at the University of Calgary and lead author of the study. The researchers scanned ...
Astronauts plan spacewalk at ISS on Tuesday to prepare for new solar arrays

Astronauts plan spacewalk at ISS on Tuesday to prepare for new solar arrays

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., March 15 (UPI) -- Two NASA astronauts plan a spacewalk on Tuesday to prepare for the installation of new solar arrays at the International Space Station, amid tension between Russia and the United States over the Ukraine conflict. Astronauts Kayla Barron, 34, and Raja Chari, 44, plan to exit the station around 8 a.m. EDT for a roughly six-hour spacewalk -- their second and first spacewalks, respectively. They intend to install brackets and struts that will support the future installation of solar arrays. Two of six new solar arrays have been unfurled to power the station's electronics over the past year. NASA officials commented on the tensions over Russia's invasion of Ukraine during a press conference Monday. Joel Montalbano, NASA manager of the ISS program, directly addr...
Astronauts splash down in Gulf of Mexico off Florida

Astronauts splash down in Gulf of Mexico off Florida

Science
May 2 (UPI) -- Astronauts from SpaceX's Crew-1 mission splashed down in U.S. waters at 2:57 a.m. Sunday, and crews successfully recovered the capsule and astronauts in the Gulf of Mexico off Panama City, Fla. The astronauts saw the Crew Dragon capsule Resilience undock from the International Space Station at 8:35 p.m. EDT Saturday and head for the nighttime splashdown off Florida about 6 1/2 hours later. Advertisement The astronauts were to fly back to Houston. "Welcome home Victor, Michael, Shannon, and Soichi, and congratulations to the teams at NASA and SpaceX who worked so hard to ensure their safe and successful splashdown," said former Sen. Bill Nelson, also a former astronaut confirmed by the Senate to serve as NASA administrator on Thursday. "We've accomplished another incredible ...
SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts to return to Earth from ISS

SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts to return to Earth from ISS

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., April 30 (UPI) -- The first operational crew of astronauts on a SpaceX orbital mission, Crew-1, plan to start their return to Earth on Friday after making history on a journey to the International Space Station. NASA plans to bring the crew of four home starting at 5:55 p.m. EDT, when the Crew Dragon capsule Resilience will undock from the space station. Advertisement After a relatively quick flight, the capsule is scheduled to splash down in the Atlantic Ocean near the coast of Florida at 11:36 a.m. Saturday. The flight marked the first time four people flew in a space capsule and was only the second crewed mission for SpaceX and NASA's commercial crew program. The capsule will fly automatically, or robotically, unless there is a serious problem, crew commander Mike Hopki...
‘Astronauts aren’t just men – we’re astronauts too’

‘Astronauts aren’t just men – we’re astronauts too’

Science
A seven-year-old aspiring astronaut has spent lockdown building and "launching" a homemade rocket into the sky from her Leicester home.Elizabeth treated fans on her social media accounts to a "static fire" of her cardboard rocket from her parents' living room before rolling the rocket out to a launch pad in the garden.Elizabeth shares her favourite experiments on her YouTube channel, which has hundreds of subscribers.Her online fame has also led to opportunities with American-based payload company, Astrobotic, which has offered to take her YouTube sticker to the moon on board their Peregrine lunar lander later this year.Elizabeth's mother, Jennifer, who is originally from Connecticut, said the US space agency's plans to send a woman to the moon were "huge for humanity"."I'm excited to be t...