Friday, December 2News That Matters
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Tag: bones

With new supplies, space station astronauts to research mending broken bones

With new supplies, space station astronauts to research mending broken bones

Science
Nov. 21 (UPI) -- New research on the International Space Station will include implantable drug delivery devices and an adhesive that can stimulate bone growth. SpaceX will launch a resupply mission as early as Tuesday to deliver a payload of items developed by commercial companies that need to be tested in orbit. The launch window opens at 3:54 p.m. EST. It will be the 26th commercial resupply service mission by SpaceX and NASA. The Falcon 9 rocket is to be launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The space-based research is sponsored by the ISS National Laboratory. The bone-mending injectable adhesive, called Tetranite, was developed by medical device company RevBio. The adhesive is intended to speed bone growth after breaks and fractures. The research will focus on how Tetran...
Neanderthals preferred bovine bones for leather-making tools

Neanderthals preferred bovine bones for leather-making tools

Science
May 8 (UPI) -- When it came to selecting bones for leather-making tools, Neanderthals were surprisingly choosy. New archaeological analysis shows Neanderthals preferentially selected bovine rib bones to make a tool called a lissoir. Neanderthals used lissoirs, made from animal rib bones, to soften up animal hides and transform them into workable leather. Most lissoirs are so worn smooth that it is impossible to tell what animal the rib bones were sourced from. For the new study, published this week in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers used highly sensitive mass spectrometry to analyze collagen protein residues on ancient lissoirs. The technique -- called ZooMS, short for zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry -- involves the breakup of fossil samples into tiny fragments. By measur...
Give your bones a workout, public told

Give your bones a workout, public told

Health
Too many of us are neglecting to do exercises for strong muscles and bones, says Public Health England (PHE).It's launched a new report giving advice on how people can age better by doing the right workouts. While the message about doing aerobic exercise for a healthy heart and lungs is getting through, people are less clear about the need to look after their overall strength too, it says. We should all be doing strengthening exercises at least twice a week.Lifting weights is one option, but taking up tennis or dancing also works, says PHE and the Centre for Ageing Better. Activities offering the most benefit include: Ball games Racket sports Dance Nordic walking (walking with poles to give your upper body a workout as well as your legs) Resistance train...
Bones found in 1940 seem to be Amelia Earhart's, study says

Bones found in 1940 seem to be Amelia Earhart's, study says

Technology
Bones found in 1940 on a western Pacific Ocean island were quite likely to be remains from famed aviator Amelia Earhart, a new analysis concludes. The study and other evidence "point toward her rather strongly," University of Tennessee anthropologist Richard Jantz said Thursday. Earhart disappeared during an attempted flight around the world in 1937, and the search for an answer to what happened to her and her navigator has captivated the public for decades. Jantz's analysis is the latest chapter in a back-and-forth that has played out about the remains, which were found in 1940 on Nikumaroro Island but are now lost. All that survive are seven measurements, from the skull and bones of the arm and leg. Those measurements led a scientist in 1941 to conclude the bones belong to a man. In 199...
Bones found on South Pacific island belonged to Amelia Earhart, study concludes

Bones found on South Pacific island belonged to Amelia Earhart, study concludes

Science
March 7 (UPI) -- The bones found several decades ago on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of famed pilot Amelia Earhart. Anthropologist Richard Jantz is 99 percent sure of it.Jantz, a professor and researcher at the University of Tennessee, recently reanalyzed measurements taken of the bones by physician D. W. Hoodless. In 1940, Hoodless determined the bones belonged to a man -- not Earhart, who disappeared along with her plane in 1937.In a new paper published in the journal Forensic Anthropology, Jantz presents evidence contradicting Hoodless' conclusion.Jantz is the co-creater of a computer program designed to analyze the sex, ancestry and stature of a person based on skeletal measurements. When Jantz plugged the measurements made by Hoodless into the Fordisc program...