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Breakthrough mRNA vaccine developed for cancer immunotherapy

Breakthrough mRNA vaccine developed for cancer immunotherapy

Technology
Research involving messenger RNA (mRNA) has accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic, and scientists are now reporting a new vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.Similar to COVID-19 vaccines, Chinese scientists have developed a new mRNA vaccine that activates the immune system to attack a protein made by tumour cells instead of the protein produced by the coronavirus. Crucially, this mRNA is contained in a breakthrough hydrogel developed by the team from the Chinese National Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, that, when injected into mice with melanoma, slowly released the RNA which successfully caused tumours to shrink and prevented them from metastasising. Both of the COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna use mRNA to send genetic instructions to the body's cells ...
Pandemic means young people face cancer treatment alone

Pandemic means young people face cancer treatment alone

Health
Teenage Cancer TrustCovid restrictions have made this year much tougher for young people already dealing with a cancer diagnosis. Sophie, like many other young cancer patients, has had to attend appointments and treatments alone, with no family or friends at her side. "My mum was crying, I was crying and she had to leave me at the door and drive off," the 24-year-old says.Last year, she was told she would need hospital treatment for five weeks, 70 miles away from home. "We had to travel to Manchester so my mum drove me," Sophie says."We got to the door and I had my suitcase - I was struggling alone with this suitcase."My mum was terrified leaving me, because she was probably thinking, 'I can't be there to comfort her,' and as well, if things go wrong, would she be walking back out of the ...
Cancer deaths in U.S. down by nearly one-third in last 20 years, analysis finds

Cancer deaths in U.S. down by nearly one-third in last 20 years, analysis finds

Health
Jan. 12 (UPI) -- Deaths from cancer in the United States fell 31% between 1991 and 2018, according to an analysis published Tuesday by the American Cancer Society. However, the report estimates that this year, nearly 1.9 million people will be diagnosed cancer and more than 600,000 will die from the disease. Advertisement The estimates are based on currently available data on cancer incidence and mortality from 2018 and do not account for the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the society said. "The impact of COVID-19 on cancer diagnoses and outcomes at the population level will be unknown for several years because of the time necessary for data collection, compilation, quality control and dissemination, report co-author Rebecca Siegel said in a statement. "We anticipate that disruptions i...
Study: Modified immunotherapy may work in advanced breast cancer

Study: Modified immunotherapy may work in advanced breast cancer

Health
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Women with advanced breast cancer may have a new weapon in their fight against the disease -- a modified form of immunotherapy. CAR-T immunotherapy, in which T cells from a patient's immune system are modified to target cancer cells, has been most effective in the treatment of B-cell leukemia or lymphoma, both of which are cell-based, rather than solid-tumor cancers like breast cancer. Advertisement Adding a molecule found in immune cells called cGAMP to standard CAR-T boosts its efficacy in breast cancer by encouraging the body's immune cells to attack solid tumors, according to the authors of a study published Thursday by the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The success of this boosted CAR-T in mice used for the study may be a potential "game changer," researchers said...
Medicaid expansion likely improved colon cancer care, study finds

Medicaid expansion likely improved colon cancer care, study finds

Health
Nov. 23 (UPI) -- Medicaid expansion has likely improved care of colon cancer, researchers said in a study published Monday in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The researchers compared states that expanded Medicaid health insurance in 2014 to non-expansion states and found that expansion led to earlier diagnosis, better access to care and improved surgical care. Advertisement The reason states had more stage 1 diagnosis after Medicaid expansion is unclear, but may indicate better access to care, Samer Tohme, senior investigator on the study, said in a press release. "Studies show that patients who are diagnosed with cancer at an earlier stage are more likely to have better treatment options, improved quality of care, and longer survival," said Tohme, a surgical oncologist a...