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Tag: Cellphone

Coast Guard taps cellphone location data to speed searches

Technology
The U.S. Coast Guard is tapping into cellphone location data to provide a new tool for helping distressed boatersByThe Associated PressMay 10, 2020, 12:57 PM2 min read2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleBOSTON -- The U.S. Coast Guard is tapping into cellphone location data to quickly locate distressed boaters. The voluntary i911 program lets the Coast Guard access mariners' cellphone locations to help rescue crews find them faster. The software is a free service for all first responders, including the Coast Guard. “It greatly decreases the time we spend looking for someone and gets the rescue crews out faster,” said Chief Petty Officer Andrew Case from the Coast Guard center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The Coast Guard center in the Northeast was the first to tes...
Inmate: Prison officers complicit in cellphone problem

Inmate: Prison officers complicit in cellphone problem

Technology
South Carolina prison officials have for years blamed cellphones for contributing to inmate violence. After a bloody riot left seven inmates dead at a maximum-security prison last week, they again find themselves asking federal officials to grant waivers and change laws to let them block the signals of these contraband devices. Gov. Henry McMaster issued an executive order Monday easing hiring rules for new corrections officers. McMaster said a shortage of officers was allowing contraband to flow freely into the state's prisons, provoking often deadly inmate battles. But some who have spent time in and around the prisons say it is not a lack of corrections officers — but the inaction and collusion of those already on the job — that has led to the abundance of contraband. Because cellphones...
Cellphone service could be spotty for rural eclipse-watchers

Cellphone service could be spotty for rural eclipse-watchers

Technology
If you plan to livestream next month's solar eclipse from one of the prime viewing spots, here's a thought: Keep your phone in your pocket, put on your paper shades and just enjoy the celestial wonder. The Aug. 21 solar eclipse, when passage of the moon completely blocks out the sun, will be seen first in Oregon and cut diagonally across 14 states to South Carolina. It will be the first total solar eclipse visible coast-to-coast since 1918. The best places to see it fall within a 60- to 70-mile-wide swath known as the "path of totality," where there will be periods of total darkness ranging up to two minutes and 40 seconds. The path carves through largely rural areas, where cellphone service can be spotty at best, though, so it may not be possible to quickly post to Facebook, Instagram an...