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Tag: clinics

‘We know this is real’: New clinics aid virus ‘long-haulers’

Health
NEW YORK -- COVID-19 came early for Catherine Busa, and it never really left.The 54-year-old New York City school secretary didn’t have any underlying health problems when she caught the coronavirus in March, and she recovered at her Queens home.But some symptoms lingered: fatigue she never experienced during years of rising at 5 a.m. for work; pain, especially in her hands and wrists; an altered sense of taste and smell that made food unappealing; and a welling depression. After eights months of suffering, she made her way to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center — to a clinic specifically for post-COVID-19 care.“I felt myself in kind of a hole, and I couldn’t look on the bright side,” Busa said. She did not feel helped by visits to other doctors. But it was different at the clinic.“They valida...
Study: 40 percent of medical clinics refuse to treat regular opioid users

Study: 40 percent of medical clinics refuse to treat regular opioid users

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- People who take opioids for chronic pain have a harder time finding a doctor than non-opioid taking patients, a new study. About 40 percent of primary care clinics refuse to take patients who regularly use Percocet, regardless of what type of health insurance they have, according to research published Friday in JAMA Network Open. "Anecdotally, we were hearing about patients with chronic pain becoming 'pain refugees,' being abruptly tapered from their opioids or having their current physician stop refilling their prescription, leaving them to search for pain relief elsewhere," Pooja Lagisetty, a researcher at the University of Michigan and study lead researcher, said in a news release. "These findings are concerning because it demonstrates just how difficult it may be for...
The doctor is out: Many millennials choose convenient clinics over doctor's offices

The doctor is out: Many millennials choose convenient clinics over doctor's offices

Health
This story is from Kaiser Health News. Calvin Brown doesn’t have a primary care doctor — and the peripatetic 23-year-old doesn’t want one. Since his graduation last year from the University of San Diego, Brown has held a series of jobs that have taken him to several California cities. “As a young person in a nomadic state,” Brown said, he prefers finding a walk-in clinic on the rare occasions when he’s sick. “The whole ‘going to the doctor’ phenomenon is something that’s fading away from our generation,” said Brown, who now lives in Daly City outside San Francisco. “It means getting in a car [and] going to a waiting room.” In his view, urgent care, which costs him about $ 40 per visit, is more convenient &...