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Companies back moratorium on deep sea mining

Companies back moratorium on deep sea mining

Science
A long-running dispute over plans to start mining the ocean floor has suddenly flared up.For years it was only environmental groups that objected to the idea of digging up metals from the deep sea.But now BMW, Volvo, Google and Samsung are lending their weight to calls for a moratorium on the proposals. The move has been criticised by companies behind the deep sea mining plans, who say the practice is more sustainable in the ocean than on land.The concept, first envisaged in the 1960s, is to extract billions of potato-sized rocks called nodules from the abyssal plains of the oceans several miles deep.Rich in valuable minerals, these nodules have long been prized as the source of a new kind of gold rush that could supply the global economy for centuries.Interest in them has intensified beca...
Rocks at the bottom of the deep ocean provide marine food chains with vital nutrients

Rocks at the bottom of the deep ocean provide marine food chains with vital nutrients

Science
March 27 (UPI) -- Marine food chains are fueled by nutrients from decaying rocks located thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean. According to a new study, published this week in the journal PNAS, phytoplankton and marine algae, which form the bases of aquatic food webs, rely on nitrogen released from sediments on the floor of the deep ocean. Advertisement Previously, scientists have argued oxygen in the deep ocean prevents dissolved iron from escaping eroded seabed rocks. The latest findings suggest the opposite is true -- oxygen and organic matter in the deep ocean may actually aid the release of nitrogen from marine sediments. "Our findings reveal that the shallow surface of the deep seafloor provides an important source of iron -- a scarce micronutrient -- for the ocean," le...
Global warming to keep driving winds poleward, deep sea dust suggests

Global warming to keep driving winds poleward, deep sea dust suggests

Science
Jan. 6 (UPI) -- New analysis of dust grains dredged from the bottom of the North Pacific suggests the westerlies moved toward the poles during the warmest stretches of the Pliocene, between 3 and 5 million years ago. Scientists on Wednesday published their findings in the journal Nature. Advertisement The westerlies, sometimes called the anti-trades, are a series of prevailing winds blowing from west to east across the middle latitudes. Over the last several decades, scientists have noticed the winds slowly migrating away from the equator, inching into higher and higher latitudes. "Much of the work that has been done in describing changes to the westerlies over the last several decades suggests that warming caused by greenhouse gases may be a major contributor to this movement of the wes...
Atlantic discovery: 12 new species ‘hiding in the deep’

Atlantic discovery: 12 new species ‘hiding in the deep’

Science
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Israel says it uncovers deep militant tunnel dug from Gaza

World
The Israeli military says militants in the Gaza Strip dug a tunnel dozens of meters (yards) deep that crossed under the security fence around the territory before it was detected by underground sensorsByThe Associated PressOctober 20, 2020, 9:14 PM• 2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleJERUSALEM -- The Israeli military said Tuesday that militants in the Gaza Strip dug a tunnel dozens of meters (yards) deep that crossed under the security fence around the territory before it was detected by underground sensors.Hours after the announcement, a rocket fired from Gaza was intercepted by Israeli missile defenses, the military said. Late Tuesday, the army said fighter jets and attack helicopters “struck an underground infrastructure” for the militant Hamas group. There wer...