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Tag: diagnose

Microphone could diagnose ‘noisy’ arthritic knees

Microphone could diagnose ‘noisy’ arthritic knees

Health
Technology used by engineers to listen for faults in bridges could be used to diagnose 'noisy' arthritic knees, a study suggests.It involved a tiny microphone being attached to participants' knees to pick up high-frequency sounds.Although not audible to humans, the waveforms can be analysed by computers to give an insight into knee health.Better diagnosis of osteoarthritis and more tailored treatments are possible, the researchers said.But they acknowledged that more research and trials in larger numbers of people were needed first.Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common degenerative joint condition, which can cause pain, stiffness and swelling in the joint.Normally, the body can repair low-level damage to the joints - but with os...
Paleontologists diagnose 240-million-year-old proto-turtle with bone cancer

Paleontologists diagnose 240-million-year-old proto-turtle with bone cancer

Science
Feb. 7 (UPI) -- Bone cancer may be nearly as old as bones. Researchers have discovered evidence of an aggressive malignant tumor in the femur of a 240-million-year-old proto-turtle -- the oldest case of bone cancer in amniotes, a lineage of four-limbed vertebrates that includes birds, reptiles and mammals. Scientists described their diagnosis this week in the journal JAMA Oncology. Bone cancer is rare in the fossil record, not because it wasn't around a few hundred million years ago, but because it's hard to spot. Cancerous growths are usually hidden inside bones, only detectable with an X-ray machine or CT scan. The growth on the femur of Pappochelys rosinae -- perhaps the first turtle species -- can be seen with the naked eye. While it was obvious there was something wrong with the pri...
Scientists find genetic marker to diagnose aggressive prostate cancer

Scientists find genetic marker to diagnose aggressive prostate cancer

Health
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- Scientists have found a genetic marker for aggressive prostate cancer, which ultimately could lead to a better way to detect the disease. The genetic mutation is responsible for high risk of the aggressive form of cancer, according to researchers at the University of Turku in Finland, who published their findings Wednesday in the International Journal of Cancer. No test currently exists to diagnose aggressive prostate cancer at an early stage. Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy among men in the United States, will affect approximately 11.6 percent of men during their lifetime, according the National Cancer Institute. For the aggressive prostate cancer, the 10-year survival rate for men is 26 percent, according to The Prostate Center in England. Researchers studi...
Study: Inexpensive nasal brush test can diagnose asthma

Study: Inexpensive nasal brush test can diagnose asthma

Health
June 11 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a simple nasal brush test than can accurately identify mild to moderate asthma in a cheaper way than pulmonary diagnostics. The most common tests for asthma are spirometry, which measures how much and how quickly air can blow out of lungs, and methacholine, which is an agent that, when inhaled, causes the airways to spasm and narrow if asthma is present. But the equipment is not usually available in primary care settings and they can't differentiate between asthma and other respiratory diseases, researchers say. In addition, people may feel dizzy and faint doing the breathing tests. The nasal brush -- which works the way it sounds -- can more easily and comfortably differentiate an asthma diagnosis from other respiratory conditions, including a...
Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries

Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries

Health
April 30 (UPI) -- By finding changes to tiny blood vessels in the brains of people with traumatic injuries, researchers believe medical personnel could be able to make more precise diagnosis and treatment decisions.Researchers found that changes in the blood vessels may be linked to a range of cognitive symptoms after a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. The research, which was led by the University of Pennsylvania, was presented Friday at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting and has not yet been published."The relationship between microvascular and structural injury in chronic TBI has been recognized for years, but underappreciated," Dr. Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, director of the Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Research Center at the Perelman School of Medicine at Pennsylvania, said in...