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Tag: diseases

Rejuvenation of woman’s skin could tackle diseases of ageing

Rejuvenation of woman’s skin could tackle diseases of ageing

Science
Fátima SantosResearchers have rejuvenated a 53-year-old woman's skin cells so they are the equivalent of a 23-year-old's.The scientists in Cambridge believe that they can do the same thing with other tissues in the body.The eventual aim is to develop treatments for age-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and neurological disorders.The technology is built on the techniques used to create Dolly the cloned sheep more than 25 years ago.The head of the team, Prof Wolf Reik, of the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, told BBC News that he hoped that the technique could eventually be used to keep people healthier for longer as they grow older."We have been dreaming about this kind of thing. Many common diseases get worse with age and to think about helping people in this way is super ex...
Childhood depression closely linked to diseases, early death, study says

Childhood depression closely linked to diseases, early death, study says

Health
Dec. 9 (UPI) -- Children with depression are at significantly increased risk for diseases linked to mental health issues and early death, according to a study published Wednesday by JAMA Psychiatry. The analysis of more than a million people treated in Sweden for depression as children found that men and women who were depressed during their youth were six times as likely to die at a young age, the data showed. Advertisement In addition, childhood depression suffers had an eight times higher risk for developing sleep disorders in adulthood, according to the researchers. This could include trouble sleeping or excessive daytime sleepiness, a disorder that causes sufferers to fall asleep during daytime hours, the researchers said. "Depressed children and teenagers have an increased risk of ...
DeepMind ‘solves diseases science mystery’ with AI

DeepMind ‘solves diseases science mystery’ with AI

Technology
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Peatland conservation may prevent new diseases from jumping to humans

Peatland conservation may prevent new diseases from jumping to humans

Science
Nov. 17 (UPI) -- In a new paper, scientists argue tropical peatland areas have been mostly ignored as potential settings for new diseases to jump from animals to humans. According to the authors of the new study, published Tuesday in journal PeerJ, better protecting and restoring tropical peat-swamp forests could help curb the effects of the current pandemic, and also prevent the emergence of future zoonotic diseases. Advertisement COVID-19 has changed the way we look at the world -- and scientists say it's also changed the way they look at their areas of expertise. "As it became increasingly clear that COVID-19 wasn't going to magically disappear in a few weeks, we began thinking and talking about what the potential impacts of the pandemic might be on the conservation of this ecosystem a...
Study predicts increase in mosquito-borne diseases as planet warms

Study predicts increase in mosquito-borne diseases as planet warms

Science
Sept. 9 (UPI) -- According to a new model, urbanization and rising global temperatures will expand the range of the mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, responsible for spreading a number of debilitating diseases, including yellow fever, Zika, chikungunya and dengue fever. In a new paper, published Wednesday in the journal Lancet Planetary Health, scientists suggest infectious disease experts and public health policy makers must be ready to adapt as malaria becomes less prevalent and new threats emerge. Advertisement "Climate change is going to rearrange the landscape of infectious disease," lead study author Erin Mordecai said in a news release. "Chikungunya and dengue outbreaks like we've recently seen in East Africa are only becoming more likely across much of the continent. We need to be ...