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Tag: fishing

Bottom trawling ban for key UK fishing sites

Bottom trawling ban for key UK fishing sites

Science
Two of the UK’s most sensitive fishing sites are set to receive better protection.The Marine Management Organisation says it plans to safeguard fishing areas in Dogger Bank and South Dorset by completely banning bottom trawling.The sites are already designated as protected areas, but in reality they are not patrolled - and they’re both over-fished.Greenpeace recently dropped concrete blocks on to Dogger Bank.The intention was to deter bottom trawling. Another group, Blue Marine, took legal action to try to safeguard the sea bed.Bottom trawling is a destructive type of fishing which involves dragging weighted nets across the sea floor.The MMO is consulting on proposed by-laws prohibiting bottom-towed gear on the sites. The consultation runs to 28 March 2021.Europe's largest marine protected...
Venezuelans brave open sea on tubes, fishing for survival

Venezuelans brave open sea on tubes, fishing for survival

World
Venezuelans desperate to feed their families amid the coronavirus pandemic are heading out to the open sea on inner tubes armed with a hook and lineBy MATIAS DELACROIX and JUAN PABLO ARRÁEZ Associated PressAugust 15, 2020, 9:30 PM3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleLA GUAIRA, Venezuela -- The biggest fear is a fishhook puncturing the inner tube that keeps them afloat far from shore. Then come sharks grabbing their catch and maybe biting their legs. And the current that threatens to pull them out to sea. A small but growing number of people in the coastal town of La Guaira, just a few minutes from the capital of Caracas, have turned to the sea for sustenance since the COVID-19 pandemic has shut down the Caribbean nation’s already miserable economy. "If we had stead...
NBA players’ hobbies at Disney bubble include gaming, fishing, beer races

NBA players’ hobbies at Disney bubble include gaming, fishing, beer races

Sports
July 22 (UPI) -- At least two players have broken quarantine rules inside the NBA's coronavirus pandemic protective bubble in Orlando, Fla., but most are content in isolation and have even found new ways to connect with fans. This season, those fans are not allowed to be physically close to the world's best basketball players as arenas remain shuttered in cities around the United States due to the pandemic. Advertisement But fans also could be closer than ever before, in a figurative sense, with a behind-the-curtain look at players as they show off skills in other competitive hobbies like fishing, video games and beer chugging. "They call me 'The Hammer.' People just can't hang," said Miami Heat center Meyers Leonard, who has become a social media favorite for fans while he is in the bubb...
Commercial fishing to blame for planet’s declining shark numbers

Commercial fishing to blame for planet’s declining shark numbers

Science
Aug. 6 (UPI) -- Shark populations are shrinking across the globe and new research suggests commercial fishing is to blame. Scientists with the Zoological Society of London analyzed shark population dynamics in ecosystems throughout the world's oceans. The data suggests shark numbers are lowest in areas closest to population centers and large fish markets. Sharks aren't just less abundant in places featuring significant commercial fishing activity, they're also smaller. The data showed marine predators are smaller and less abundant within 750 miles of populations with more than 10,000 people. The new analysis -- detailed this week in the journal PLOS One Biology -- showed sharks are also smaller in warmer waters. "Human activity is now the biggest influence on sharks' distribution, overt...
World's fishing fleets mapped from orbit

World's fishing fleets mapped from orbit

Science
It's another demonstration of the power of Big Data - of mining a huge batch of statistics to see patterns of behaviour that were simply not apparent before. Computers have crunched 22 billion identification messages transmitted by sea-going vessels to map fishing activity around the globe. The analysis reveals that more than 55% of the world's oceans are subject to industrial exploitation. By area, fishing's footprint is now over four times that of agriculture. That's an astonishing observation given that fisheries provide only 1.2% of global caloric production for human food consumption. The investigation shows clearly that the biggest influences on this activity are not environmental - whether it is summer or winter, or whether there is an El Niño or fish are migrating, for example. Rat...