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Tag: glaciers

Climate change: Kilimanjaro’s and Africa’s last glaciers to go by 2050, says UN

Climate change: Kilimanjaro’s and Africa’s last glaciers to go by 2050, says UN

Science
Getty ImagesBy Patrick HughesBBC News Climate and Science Glaciers across the globe - including the last ones in Africa - will be unavoidably lost by 2050 due to climate change, the UN says in a report.Glaciers in a third of UN World Heritage sites will melt within three decades, a UNESCO report found.Mount Kilimanjaro's last glaciers will vanish as will glaciers in the Alps and Yosemite National Park in the US.They will melt regardless of the world's actions to combat climate change, the authors say.Vanishing glaciers threaten Europe's water supplyIce and sled-dogs disappear as Greenland warms upWorld's glaciers melting at a faster paceThe report, which makes projections based on satellite data, comes as world leaders prepare to meet in Egypt for next week's COP27 climate change conferenc...
Melting glaciers may speed carbon emissions, fuel climate feedback loop

Melting glaciers may speed carbon emissions, fuel climate feedback loop

Science
March 15 (UPI) -- While some of the consequences of climate change have a balancing effect, working to slow warming patterns, many more seem to fuel feedback loops that accelerate warming. Now, an international team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Leeds has found another. According to their analysis, the loss of alpine glaciers has made mountain rivers friendlier to fungi, accelerating plant decomposition and carbon emissions. Advertisement Researchers described the feedback loop in a new paper, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change. With alpine glaciers the smallest they've been in thousands of years, mountain rivers are getting warmer. They've also become less prone to water flow variability and sediment movement, allowing fungi to flourish. When f...
Now and then: Iceland’s vanishing glaciers

Now and then: Iceland’s vanishing glaciers

Science
Iceland's Skaftafellsjokull is a spur from the nation's Vatnajokull ice cap, which is Europe's largest glacier.In 1989, photographer Colin Baxter visited the glacier during a family holiday and took a picture of the frozen landscape.Colin's son, Dr Kieran Baxter, returned to the exact location 30 years later. Iceland's Skaftafellsjokull glacier A modern web browser and internet connection are required to view the image slider Drag the button to see how the glacier has changed over time .no-js.slider { margin: 0 auto; overflow: hidden; position: relative; text-align: center; } .no-js.slider p { display: block; ba...
Edinburgh University researchers use drones to map retreating Andes glaciers

Edinburgh University researchers use drones to map retreating Andes glaciers

Science
An Edinburgh university researcher has used drones to capture a bird's-eye view of some of the highest glaciers in South America.Rosie Bisset is part of a project to map the Andes glaciers which are retreating in the face of global heating, despite their high altitude. Experts say these glaciers are a vital resource which are under threat. The glaciers in Peru have shrunk by about 30% in the last couple of decades. Peter Nienow, professor of geology at the University of Edinburgh, said it could have a devastating effect on local people. "In the Andes in Peru, which have about 70% of the world's glacier area in the tropics, those glacial areas are retreating," he said. "As they retreat that impacts downstream communities because t...
Melting Himalayan glaciers increase risk for glacial lake outburst floods

Melting Himalayan glaciers increase risk for glacial lake outburst floods

Science
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Simulations designed and run by researchers at the University of Potsdam suggest thousands of lakes in the Himalayas are at risk of generating dangerous outburst floods as rising global temperatures continue to melt the region's snow and ice. Glacial lakes form as melt water pools in mountain crevices. These natural lakes have proliferated throughout the Himalayas over the last two decades as global temperatures have continued to rise. Many of these lakes are naturally dammed by moraines, barriers compiled of sediment and rock held together by ice. To estimate the number of glacial lakes that are dammed by unstable moraines, researchers ran 5.4 billion computer simulations using data from topographical maps and satellite surveys. Their models found 5,000 lakes feature un...