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Nearly half of U.S. adults fear surprise bills, do,

Nearly half of U.S. adults fear surprise bills, do,

Health
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- Nearly half of adults in the United States report that concerns over unexpected medical bills keeps them from seeking care, according to a survey by the American Heart Association. In addition, more than 40% of respondents indicated that if they received an unexpected medical bill for $ 1,000, they would not have the money to pay for it, the data showed. Advertisement Two-thirds of respondents with private health insurance also said they have received an unexpected medical bill, and of those, one in three was not able to pay it. Perhaps as a result, more than 80% of survey respondents would like to see Congress pass legislation to end surprise medical billing, the American Heart Association said. "Surprise medical bills are a major driver of financial anxiety and disrupt...
Half of urban Indians have no retirement plan: PGIM India Mutual Fund survey

Half of urban Indians have no retirement plan: PGIM India Mutual Fund survey

Finance
City dwellers today are saving and investing less, allocating more than half their income to current expenses, finds a survey commissioned by PGIM India Mutual Fund. Do Indians have a retirement plan in place? No: 51% Yes: 49% Worry about the future, however, is increasing People are worried about the cost of living, healthcare issues and the lack of family support in future. Retirement comes way down on the list of financial priorities Children’s needs and security of the family take precedence over all else. PRIORITIES 1. Providing for child’s future, education and marriage 2. Financial security of children 3. Financial security of spouse 4. Providing for medical emergencies 5. Being physically and mentally fit 6. Leading a life without stress or burden 7. Improving standard of living 8...
Stay-at-home orders cut noise exposure almost in half

Stay-at-home orders cut noise exposure almost in half

Science
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Sometimes, living the quiet life is a choice. Other times, it's the reality of a global pandemic. New research suggests lockdowns and stay-at-home orders led to a dramatic reduction in noise exposure. For the study, published Friday in the journal Environmental Research Letters, scientists at the University of Michigan collected noise exposure data from volunteer Apple Watch wearers in Florida, New York, California and Texas. Advertisement "Volunteer participants opted to share environmental sound data from their Apple Watch and headphone sound data from their iPhone," researchers wrote. "Participants for this analysis were chosen from four states which exhibited diverse responses to COVID-19." Scientists analyzed more than half-a-million sound exposure measurements from b...
Nearly half of consumers don’t understand whole grain labels on foods, study finds

Nearly half of consumers don’t understand whole grain labels on foods, study finds

Health
Aug. 10 (UPI) -- Up to half of all U.S. consumers are confused by the labeling on food products such as cereal, bread and crackers, causing them to make fewer healthy choices when shopping, according to a study published Monday by the journal Public Health Nutrition. Consumers asked to identify the healthier options based on whole grain content made the wrong choice 47% of the time for bread, up to 37% for crackers and 31% for cereal, the researchers said. Advertisement The findings suggest that product labels, particularly as they relate to grain content, are confusing to consumers, researchers said. "The general public has heard [that we should] eat more whole grains and, knowing this, food manufacturers sometimes design their packages to make consumers think [their products] have more ...
Under-20s half as likely to catch coronavirus, according to study

Under-20s half as likely to catch coronavirus, according to study

Technology
Under-20s are half as likely to catch COVID-19 as over-20s, making school closures less effective at stopping the spread of the virus, a new scientific study has found.Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that susceptibility to the coronavirus was low for younger people, before increasing around the age of 20. Nicholas Davies , one of the peer-reviewed paper's co-authors, said there was "a very sharp increase" in COVID-19 susceptibility "somewhere between the ages of 15 and 25".It is not known why this is the case. The results meant school closures were less effective in stopping the spread of coronavirus than other respiratory diseases. ...