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Tag: learn

‘Baby talk’ helps infants learn words, study finds

‘Baby talk’ helps infants learn words, study finds

Science
Dec. 10 (UPI) -- Speaking "baby talk" to infants not only helps parents and caregivers connect with the young ones in their charge, but it may also help babies learn to make words, a study published Friday by the journal Speech, Language and Hearing found. Mimicking the sound of a smaller vocal tract clues babies into how words should sound coming out of their own mouths, the researchers said. "It seems to stimulate motor production of speech, not just the perception of speech," study co-author Matthew Masapollo said in a press release. "It's not just goo-goo ga-ga," said Masapollo, an assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at the University of Florida in Gainesville. The way adults instinctively speak to babies, using a higher pitch, slower speed and exaggerated pr...
Football’s child sex abuse scandal: Survivors say game ‘must learn from mistakes’

Football’s child sex abuse scandal: Survivors say game ‘must learn from mistakes’

Sports
Last updated on 1 minute ago1 minute ago.From the section FootballSurvivors of childhood sexual abuse say football must not be complacent after the release of an independent review into historical abuse in the sport.The review found the Football Association "did not do enough to keep children safe" between 1970 and 2005.Former England international Paul Stewart said football had to ensure "this doesn't happen again".Ex-youth player Ian Ackley said it was "incredibly naive" to think childhood sexual abuse is only in the past.The long-awaited 710-page review, led by Clive Sheldon QC and commissioned by the FA in 2016, found there were "significant institutional failings" by the English game's governing body, which was "too slow" to have sufficient measures put in place to protect children.FA...
Robots help seniors learn to use technology in South Korea

Robots help seniors learn to use technology in South Korea

World
SEOUL, Nov. 9 (UPI) -- In South Korea, one of the most digitally connected societies in the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the growth of contactless technology in everyday life. But one group is finding itself struggling in a fast-changing world of communications apps, fast food-ordering kiosks and robot waiters: senior citizens. The Seoul city government is trying to help bridge the digital divide with a new program that uses specially designed robots to teach seniors how to use smartphones and touchscreen kiosks. The program, which will teach 3,000 participants over the next three months at 17 facilities, launched last week. Advertisement "Our goal is closing the digital gap between young people and seniors," said Shin Eun-kyong, business outreach manager of the Seoul Digi...

Scientists learn how tiny critters make ocean ‘snot palaces’

Technology
Scientists are learning about one of the weirder things in the oceans: “snot palaces.”By BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science WriterJune 3, 2020, 9:33 PM4 min read4 min readKENSINGTON, Maryland -- Master builders of the sea construct the equivalent of a complex five-story house that protects them from predators and funnels and filters food for them — all from snot coming out of their heads. And when these delicate mucus homes get clogged, the tadpole-looking critters — called giant larvaceans — build a new one. Usually every day or so. These so-called “snot palaces” could possibly help human construction if scientists manage to crack the mucus architectural code, said Kakani Katija, a bioengineer at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Her team took a step toward solving the myste...
Disabled flies sleep more as they learn to adapt

Disabled flies sleep more as they learn to adapt

Science
May 8 (UPI) -- Some people need to psyche themselves up to meet challenges head on. For flies, tough times call for a little shuteye. New research suggests flies that are unable to fly sleep more as they learn to adapt to their disability. The research -- published Friday in the journal Science Advances -- could offer insights into the evolutionary origins of sleep, as well as the role sleep plays in human health and development. The sleep patterns of fruit flies are quite similar to those of humans. Young flies sleep more than older flies, with the need for sleep diminishing as a fly ages. Flies that are kept up all night catch up on sleep the next day. Caffeine keeps flies up, while antihistamines make them drowsy. In humans, sleep is important for learning and neural development, and...