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Tag: medicines

Novartis to buy The Medicines Company for $9.7 billion

Health
Swiss drugmaker Novartis will buy New Jersey biotech The Medicines Company to expand its portfolio of cardiovascular drugsBy The Associated PressNovember 24, 2019, 10:07 PM1 min read Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis has reached a deal to buy cholesterol drugmaker The Medicines Co. for $ 9.7 billion. Novartis will pay $ 85 per share for the New Jersey biotech company, a sharp increase over The Medicine Co.’s Friday closing price of $ 68.55 per share. The deal is worth $ 9.7 billion, including outstanding stock options and convertible debt. The Medicines Co. is in late-stage studies of a drug, inclisiran, meant to lower cholesterol. Novartis has a pattern of acquiring other companies in recent years to expand its portfolio of drugs. “We’re hoping to reimagine treatment of the leadin...
Cannabis-based medicines: Two drugs approved for NHS

Cannabis-based medicines: Two drugs approved for NHS

Health
Two cannabis-based medicines, used to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use by the NHS in England. It follows new guidelines from the drugs advisory body NICE, which looked at products for several conditions.Charities have welcomed the move, although some campaigners who have been fighting for access to the drugs have said it does not go far enough.Both medicines were developed in the UK, where they are also grown.Doctors will be able to prescribe Epidyolex, for children with two types of severe epilepsy - Lennox Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome - which can cause multiple seizures a day. Clinical trials have shown the oral solution, which contains cannabidiol (CBD), could reduce the number of seizures by up to 40% in some...
‘Lack of evidence’ holding back cannabis medicines

‘Lack of evidence’ holding back cannabis medicines

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device NHS patients are not getting cannabis-based medicines because of a lack of evidence they work, according to an official review.Multiple sclerosis patients and parents of children with severe epilepsy have been fighting for access to the drugs.The NHS England report found hospitals also had issues affording the medicines and getting hold of a safe supply.The report said the health service must support studies to gather evidence "as soon as possible".The law was changed in November 2018 to allow specialist doctors to prescribe medicinal cannabis for the first time. The decision fuelled demand from parents of children with severe epilepsy, who were having hundreds of seizures a week, as well as patient...
‘Pack children’s medicines in your hand luggage’

‘Pack children’s medicines in your hand luggage’

Health
Medications for children should be placed in hand luggage on a flight in case they become ill during the journey, a new study suggests.US experts say most in-flight incidents involve common conditions that should be easily treated - but airlines often fail to carry children's medicines.They say their analysis should provide a "shopping list" for airlines.A UK expert said parents preparing for their summer break should ensure they had suitable medications with them.The team from Duke University in North Carolina looked at data on 75,000 medical incidents from 77 airlines on six continents between January 2015 and October 2016.Around 11,000 involved children and teenagers aged up to 19.Nausea and vomiting were the most common condi...
Paramedics set to prescribe medicines

Paramedics set to prescribe medicines

Health
Advanced paramedics in England will be able to prescribe medicines to people who do not need hospital treatment, under new laws starting on Sunday.Up to seven out of 10 people currently seen by advanced care paramedics may need help - but not a hospital visit.Paramedics only have a limited ability to supply medicines at the moment but will now be able to do this without delay or the patient seeing their GP.Rachel Power, The Patients Association chief executive, called it "good news".She added: "It will make it easier for them to receive treatment at home, eliminate the need to see a second professional in many cases, and reduce the need for transportation into hospital that isn't clinically necessary. "Rather, they will be able to start treatment without delay, which for some will be criti...