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‘Disappointed’ travel chiefs seek clarity from PM

‘Disappointed’ travel chiefs seek clarity from PM

Business
Leading travel industry figures have reacted with dismay to Boris Johnson's latest comments on the lockdown roadmap, saying they need more clarity.The prime minister said he was "hopeful" that foreign travel could begin again on 17 May.But he said more data was needed before a firm decision could be taken.The British Travel Association said the announcement was "beyond disappointing" and called for "a clear pathway to international travel and trade".Its chief executive, Clive Wratten, said moves to open borders had "once again been kicked down the road"."The business travel industry continues to be crippled by today's lack of movement," he added.In a Downing Street briefing on Monday, Mr Johnson said he did not want to see coronavirus re-imported from abroad and urged people to await a rep...
Spring training: Teams seek fresh start after COVID-19 threw MLB a curve in 2020

Spring training: Teams seek fresh start after COVID-19 threw MLB a curve in 2020

Sports
MIAMI, Feb. 27 (UPI) -- The Miami Marlins were arguably the MLB team most impacted by COVID-19 in 2020. They'll be one of 28 teams that start MLB spring training games Sunday with a renewed sense of optimism and appreciation for baseball. "It's going to be a full season, so let's see what we are made of," Marlins infielder Miguel Rojas told reporters Wednesday on a Zoom video conference. Advertisement All 30 MLB teams reported to camps last week, with half the league at training facilities in Florida and the other half in Arizona. The reporting dates came almost exactly a year after teams reported in 2020. Last year's preseason slate suddenly stopped in March, though, because of the coronavirus pandemic, which prompted an unprecedented MLB season. Forty-three 43 games were postponed and ...
Brexit stalemate: Boris Johnson and Ursula Von Der Leyen seek to break trade deal deadlock

Brexit stalemate: Boris Johnson and Ursula Von Der Leyen seek to break trade deal deadlock

Business
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NASA, space industry seek new ways to cope with space debris

NASA, space industry seek new ways to cope with space debris

Science
Oct. 5 (UPI) -- NASA's official watchdog panel has renewed calls for the agency to move faster on a plan to better track and mitigate dangers posed by orbiting debris in space. Members of NASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel said during a regular meeting last week that the agency has made some progress, but it needs to focus on space debris as a top priority. Advertisement At stake is the safety of astronauts, anyone going into space on planned private missions and the nation's growing fleet of satellites used for national security, communications and scientific observation. Because debris orbits at thousands of miles per hour, even tiny pieces of space trash can puncture spacecraft. The panel's comments came on the heels of NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine telling a Senate Committee...

Deadline extended for tribes to seek broadband licenses

Technology
Tribes have another month to apply for a band of wireless spectrum to establish or expand internet on their landsBy FELICIA FONSECA Associated PressJuly 31, 2020, 11:27 PM3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleFLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The Federal Communications Commission is giving tribes another month to apply for a band of wireless spectrum that would help them establish or expand internet access on their land — far less time than what tribes had sought. Tribes pushed to be first in line to apply for licenses for the mid-band spectrum that is largely unassigned across the western United States and can be used for fixed or mobile internet service. The licenses once were reserved for educational institutions. The tribal priority window opened in February and was set to cl...