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Tag: systems

Survey finds 82% of dead eagles with rat poison in their systems

Survey finds 82% of dead eagles with rat poison in their systems

Science
April 7 (UPI) -- Scientists found rat poison in the systems of 82% of the few hundred dead eagles examined for a multiyear survey between 2014 and 2018. The survey results, published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One, are a reminder of the lurking threats that face even the most well-protected animals. Advertisement "Generally, bald eagle populations have been thriving in the United States. This is great news and a conservation success story," corresponding author Mark Ruder told UPI in an email. "However, as wildlife health researchers, we are always concerned about the health of wildlife, including eagles. We live in a changing world and the human population puts a lot of pressure on our natural resources," said Ruder, an assistant professor at the University of Georgia's College of Vet...
BAE Systems hands Woodburn £2m pay rise after poaching bid

BAE Systems hands Woodburn £2m pay rise after poaching bid

Business
Britain's biggest defence contractor has handed its chief executive a multimillion pound pay rise as its board scrambled to prevent a rival FTSE-100 company from poaching him.Sky News can reveal that BAE Systems has increased Charles Woodburn's base salary by well over £100,000 and awarded him an additional 'golden handcuffs' share package worth £2m to ensure his continued tenure at the company. City sources said on Friday that BAE's board had consulted widely with its top shareholders on the issue and had received their support to incentivise Dr Woodburn to stay.Details of the special remuneration arrangements, which the company described as a "one-off", were contained in BAE's annual report published this week.Dr Woodburn's annual salary has been increased to just over £1.1m, while a per...
BAE Systems wins $3.2B contract for British munitions

BAE Systems wins $3.2B contract for British munitions

Business
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- BAE Systems was awarded a $ 3.2 billion munitions contract for Britain's Next Generation Munitions Solution program, the defense ministry announced Monday. The British-based company will manufacture 39 different munitions for the Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air Force and Strategic Command for front-line use, including small arms ammunition, mortars, medium-caliber gun rounds and large-caliber artillery and tank shells. Advertisement The 15-year contract calls for manufacturing improvements in five BAE facilities in Britain, and is part of a $ 22 billion, four-year increase in British defense spending announced on Nov. 19. "This vital multi-billion-pound contract will provide our service men and women with fire power on the front line for years to come whilst investing in Brit...
Climate change: Better warning systems needed for extreme weather – UN

Climate change: Better warning systems needed for extreme weather – UN

Science
A new UN report says the world needs to rapidly raise investment in early warning systems for extreme weather events.Over the past 50 years, recorded disasters have increased five-fold, thanks in part to climate change.The study warns that one in three people on Earth are not adequately covered by warning systems.The numbers of people in need after natural disasters could increase by 50% over the next decade. The State of Climate Services 2020 has been produced by experts from 16 international agencies and financial institutions, and co-ordinated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Over the past 50 years, it says, some 11,000 disasters involving weather, clim...
Humans a more immediate threat to large river systems than climate change

Humans a more immediate threat to large river systems than climate change

Science
June 19 (UPI) -- Climate change promises to disrupt a variety of natural systems across the globe, but new research suggests human activities pose a more immediate threat to the planet's largest river systems. For the study -- published Friday in the journal One Earth -- scientists synthesized past work on the most significant stressors affecting large rivers. Advertisement The new survey identified a variety of human activities that hamper the natural resiliency of major river systems, including: damming, dredging, land-use change, pollution, introduction of non-native species, water diversion and subsidence caused by groundwater extraction. "These are in addition to those of climate change -- flooding and droughts -- and greenhouse-gas linked sea-level rise," lead study author Jim Best ...