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Tag: telescope

James Webb: Space telescope reveals ‘incredible’ Jupiter views

James Webb: Space telescope reveals ‘incredible’ Jupiter views

Science
NASA/ESA/CSA/Jupiter ERS Team/Judy SchmidtThe world's largest and most powerful space telescope has revealed unprecedented views of Jupiter. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) took the pictures of the Solar System's biggest planet in July. The images show auroras, giant storms, moons and rings surrounding Jupiter in detail that astronomers have described as "incredible".The infrared images were artificially coloured to make the features stand out.This is because infrared light is invisible to the human eye."We've never seen Jupiter like this. It's all quite incredible," said planetary astronomer Imke de Pater, of the University of California, who played a key role in the project."We hadn't really expected it to be this good, to be honest," she added.The $ 10bn (£8.5bn) JWST is an intern...
James Webb telescope begins crucial sun shield tensioning

James Webb telescope begins crucial sun shield tensioning

Science
Jan. 3 (UPI) -- The James Webb Space Telescope began one of the most complicated parts of its deployment Monday as NASA sent commands to fully extend the first layer of the observatory's critical five-layer sunshield. The $ 10 billion space telescope -- the largest and most powerful in history -- still is in the first half of its 29-day deployment schedule as it flies through space to a position over one million miles from Earth. Mission controllers worked through two minor issues Sunday that could have degraded performance of the spacecraft over time, according to NASA. But the agency said the space telescope was never in danger and the extra day allowed it to return Webb to optimal performance. On Tuesday and Wednesday, NASA intends to extend the remaining five layers of the shield, whi...
Officials seeking answers to Puerto Rico telescope collapse

Officials seeking answers to Puerto Rico telescope collapse

Technology
The National Science Foundation says it could cost up to $ 50 million just to clean up the debris at a renowned radio telescope that collapsed last year in Puerto RicoBy DÁNICA COTO Associated PressMarch 5, 2021, 9:30 PM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- The National Science Foundation said Friday that it could cost up to $ 50 million just to clean up the debris at a renowned radio telescope that collapsed last year in Puerto Rico, adding that investigations into what caused its cables to fail are still ongoing.The update is part of a report that the federal agency, which owns the telescope, had to submit to Congress as the investigation continues into the Arecibo telescope. It was until recently the world’s largest radio telescope and w...
Hubble Telescope used to study rare metal asteroid

Hubble Telescope used to study rare metal asteroid

Technology
An asteroid made of iron and nickel first discovered in 1852 could have been a protoplanet, according to scientists.The Hubble Space Telescope was used to study the asteroid, named 16 Psyche, during two points in its rotation. Dr Tracy Becker, a scientist from the Southwest Research Institute, said: "We've seen meteorites that are mostly metal, but Psyche could be unique in that it might be an asteroid that is totally made of iron and nickel." Image: NASA plan to study the asteroid in a 2026 mission. Pic: Maxar/ASU/P. Rubin/NASA/JPL-Caltech She added: "Earth has a metal core, a mantle and crust. It's possible that as a Psyche protoplanet was forming, it was struck by another object in our solar system and lost its mantle and crust."Fi...
Hubble telescope celebrates 30 years of stunning science

Hubble telescope celebrates 30 years of stunning science

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device It's 30 years ago to the day that the Hubble Space Telescope was launched.Famously blighted by blurred vision at the outset, the observatory was eventually repaired and upgraded.The remarkable pictures it has taken of planets, stars, and galaxies have transformed our view of the cosmos. Indeed, there are those who think Hubble is the most important scientific tool ever built.It's still far from retirement.The US space agency (Nasa), which runs the observatory in partnership with the European Space Agency (Esa), says operations will be funded for as long as they remain productive. Last year, its data resulted in almost 1,000 scientific papers being published - so it continues to stand at the forefron...