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Tag: wounds

ConvaTec hires Genus chief to heal City wounds

ConvaTec hires Genus chief to heal City wounds

Business
By Mark Kleinman, City editor The embattled‎ medical devices maker ConvaTec will announce a sweeping boardroom overhaul on Monday including the departure of chairman Sir Christopher Gent, one of the most prominent figures in British business.Sky News has learnt that ConvaTec, which has seen its shares slump since listing in 2016, will say that Karim Bitar, currently chief executive of animal genetics company Genus‎, will join it in the same role. His appointment will come ‎more than five months after Paul Moraviec stepped down as the boss of ConvaTec, which makes devices such as catheters and colostomy bags.Mr Bitar's arrival is intended to inject some momentum into a turnaround at the FTSE-250 company, which has a market value of £2....
Daytime wounds 'heal more quickly'

Daytime wounds 'heal more quickly'

Health
Wounds heal more quickly if they occur during the day rather than after dark, a study suggests. It found burns sustained at night took an average of 28 days to heal, but just 17 for those that happened in daytime.The team, at the UK's MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, said they were astounded by the difference they saw in 118 burns patients they studied. The effect was explained by the way body clock ticks inside nearly every human cell across a 24-hour cycle.The research, published in Science Translational Medicine, examined 118 patients at NHS burns units. It showed the average 11-day difference in healing times between people hurt at night and during the day.Detailed lab work showed skin cells called fibroblasts were changing their abilities in a 24-hour pattern.Fibroblasts are the b...
Scientists unveil a possible new way of healing wounds in the future

Scientists unveil a possible new way of healing wounds in the future

Health
Scientists at Ohio State University have developed a new method that has the capability of changing the body's existing cells into new cells to promote healing. The method, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), reprograms cells through a device that uses nanotechnology. The way it would work: First, doctors would apply a light electrical stimulation to the surface of the skin. They would then place a small chip about the size of a cuff link onto the site of the wound. Click here for more information on the study. In less than a second, this chip would deliver reprogramming factors (pre-programmed DNA or RNA) non-invasively into living skin cells via a high-intensity, focused electric field, converting them into whatever type of cells a scientist or doctor may choose. This technique has ...